revolt

verb
re·​volt | \ ri-ˈvōlt How to pronounce revolt (audio) also -ˈvȯlt \
revolted; revolting; revolts

Definition of revolt

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to renounce allegiance or subjection (as to a government) : rebel
2a : to experience disgust or shock
b : to turn away with disgust

transitive verb

: to cause to turn away or shrink with disgust or abhorrence

revolt

noun

Definition of revolt (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a renouncing of allegiance (as to a government or party) especially : a determined armed uprising
2 : a movement or expression of vigorous dissent

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Other Words from revolt

Verb

revolter noun

Choose the Right Synonym for revolt

Noun

rebellion, revolution, uprising, revolt, insurrection, mutiny mean an outbreak against authority. rebellion implies an open formidable resistance that is often unsuccessful. open rebellion against the officers revolution applies to a successful rebellion resulting in a major change (as in government). a political revolution that toppled the monarchy uprising implies a brief, limited, and often immediately ineffective rebellion. quickly put down the uprising revolt and insurrection imply an armed uprising that quickly fails or succeeds. a revolt by the Young Turks that surprised party leaders an insurrection of oppressed laborers mutiny applies to group insubordination or insurrection especially against naval authority. a mutiny led by the ship's cook

Revolution and Revolt

Revolution and revolt have a shared origin, both ultimately going back to the Latin revolvere “to revolve, roll back.” When revolution first appeared in English in the 14th century, it referred to the movement of a celestial body in orbit; that sense was extended to “a progressive motion of a body around an axis,” “completion of a course,” and other senses suggesting regularity of motion or a predictable return to an original position. At virtually the same time, the word developed a sharply different meaning, namely, ”a sudden radical, or complete change,” apparently from the idea of reversal of direction implicit in the Latin verb. Revolt , which initially meant “to renounce allegiance,” grew from the same idea of “rolling back,” in this case from a prior bond of loyalty.

Examples of revolt in a Sentence

Verb The group threatened to revolt. All the violence revolted me. Noun the revolt of the slaves The peasants' revolt was crushed by the king. The leader of the group called for revolt. Consumers are in revolt against high prices.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Hundreds of Trump supporters, including heavily armed militia members, vowed to revolt. Luke Mogelson, The New Yorker, "Among the Insurrectionists," 15 Jan. 2021 Also, the price of biofuels products can’t stray too far from the price of regular diesel or customers will revolt, according to Keever and other experts. Bryan Mena, SFChronicle.com, "California restaurants are hurting. That means less leftover cooking oil to make biofuels," 13 Dec. 2020 Will students revolt over borrowing money simply to watch lectures on their basement computers? Victor Davis Hanson Tribune News Service (tns), Star Tribune, "Let's count the ways 2020 will change American life," 23 Oct. 2020 Will students revolt over borrowing money simply to watch lectures on their basement computers? Victor Davis Hanson Tribune News Service (tns), Star Tribune, "Let's count the ways 2020 will change American life," 23 Oct. 2020 Will students revolt over borrowing money simply to watch lectures on their basement computers? Victor Davis Hanson Tribune News Service (tns), Star Tribune, "Let's count the ways 2020 will change American life," 23 Oct. 2020 Will students revolt over borrowing money simply to watch lectures on their basement computers? Victor Davis Hanson, National Review, "Will Changes to American Life Become Permanent?," 22 Oct. 2020 Hawley was a Republican success story in a midterm election that otherwise saw the suburbs revolt against the party and Democrats win the House. W. James Antle Iii, Washington Examiner, "Josh Hawley, the populist policy wonk," 19 Oct. 2020 Most of the drinks on display are beverages that are commonly consumed somewhere in the world but which would revolt outsiders unfamiliar with the taste. Paul Rhys, Star Tribune, "Phew! Revolting spit and poo brews shown in Swedish exhibit," 4 Sep. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Guest-writing gimmicks aside, Politico now has an even bigger problem — a revolt among staffers that on Thursday descended on newsroom leadership. Washington Post, "Politico’s revolt over Ben Shapiro guest-hosting Playbook went too far," 15 Jan. 2021 Like today’s revolt, Roosevelt’s crusade was premised on the raw assertion of American power for its own sake—in his case, in Panama, Cuba, and other outposts of the emerging American empire. Chris Lehmann, The New Republic, "Feeling Trump’s Pain," 11 Jan. 2021 Pelosi, 80, the only woman to hold the speaker’s gavel, faced a mini revolt in 2019 after Democrats regained the House majority in the midterm elections. Billy House, BostonGlobe.com, "Nancy Pelosi again runs for speaker of the House, but now with a slimmer majority and restive Democrats," 3 Jan. 2021 The revolt by fans over interim coach Kevin Steele possibly being the lead candidate shouldn’t be ignored by the administration even if Steele ends up remaining at Auburn as a coordinator or head coach. Joseph Goodman | Jgoodman@al.com, al, "Auburn football looks desperate in search for coach," 22 Dec. 2020 Google famously declined to renew its Maven contract following an internal revolt from employees who didn’t want the company’s algorithms involved in warfare. Aaron Gregg, Anchorage Daily News, "In a first, Air Force uses artificial intelligence aboard military jet," 16 Dec. 2020 The question that remains is whether Biden's win marks a major shift, or a temporary revolt by suburban voters who disliked Trump and who will return to the Republican fold after he's gone. Brian Slodysko, Star Tribune, "EXPLAINER: Why AP called Georgia for Biden," 19 Nov. 2020 The error, over where and when people can socialize, is likely to encourage a revolt by Johnson’s Conservative colleagues, who are unhappy ministers have imposed restrictions and new criminal offenses without debate in Parliament first. Tim Ross, Bloomberg.com, "Boris Johnson Apologizes for Getting His Covid Rules Wrong," 29 Sep. 2020 The case reflects the culmination of a revolt by app developers that began in 2016. Brian Fung And Shannon Liao, CNN, "Apple's in a war for the future of the App Store. Here's what's at stake," 25 Sep. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'revolt.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of revolt

Verb

1539, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

1560, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for revolt

Verb

Middle French revolter, from Old Italian rivoltare to overthrow, from Vulgar Latin *revolvitare, frequentative of Latin revolvere to revolve, roll back

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Time Traveler for revolt

Time Traveler

The first known use of revolt was in 1539

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Statistics for revolt

Last Updated

21 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Revolt.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/revolt. Accessed 23 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for revolt

revolt

verb
How to pronounce revolt (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of revolt

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to fight in a violent way against the rule of a leader or government
: to act in a way that shows that you do not accept the control or influence of someone or something
: to cause (someone) to feel disgust or shock

revolt

noun

English Language Learners Definition of revolt (Entry 2 of 2)

: violent action against a ruler or government
: something which shows that you will not accept something or will not agree to be controlled or influenced by someone or something

revolt

verb
re·​volt | \ ri-ˈvōlt How to pronounce revolt (audio) \
revolted; revolting

Kids Definition of revolt

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to rebel against a ruler or government
2 : to be or cause to be disgusted or shocked I was revolted by the smell.

revolt

noun

Kids Definition of revolt (Entry 2 of 2)

: violent action against a ruler or government : rebellion

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Comments on revolt

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