reverie

noun
rev·er·ie | \ ˈre-və-rē , ˈrev-rē \
variants: or less commonly revery
plural reveries

Definition of reverie 

1 : daydream

2 : the condition of being lost in thought

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Examples of reverie in a Sentence

I was lost in reverie and didn't realize my flight was boarding until it was almost too late.

Recent Examples on the Web

There's just one problem: People are getting stuck in their reveries and going into comas, and Onira-Tech has its bottom line to worry about. Peter Rubin, WIRED, "VR Is Back in Pop Culture—As a Warning," 29 June 2018 But now, coasting through an enchanted landscape, under overspreading branches draped with Spanish moss, their reverie turned otherworldly. Jenna Russell, BostonGlobe.com, "There is magic in those Jekyll Island oaks," 21 June 2018 Meanwhile, the abundance of beautiful women depicted in moody reverie feeds a popular expectation that art of feeling must be solemn, if not sad. Charles Desmarais, SFChronicle.com, "‘Truth and Beauty’ at Legion of Honor: Pure visual pleasure of an idiosyncratic style," 29 June 2018 Or did Patterson reverse his usual process, merely tinkering and smoothing after Clinton, musing on his years in office, had brought forth a plot—in essence, his reverie of responsible power? Anthony Lane, The New Yorker, "Bill Clinton and James Patterson’s Concussive Collaboration," 3 June 2018 All night, this Jack-in-the-box stage is a magical place, achieving unity through dreamlike reverie. Hugh Hunter, Philly.com, "Eagle Theatre's 'Little Women': Bigger than life and full of energy," 28 Jan. 2018 After the early reveries of family happiness, frustration runs through the narrative; the story grows increasingly shadowed and anxious. David Denby, The New Yorker, "Leonard Bernstein Through His Daughter’s Eyes," 16 June 2018 Comprised entirely of photographic paper, the wooded scene full of trees, insects and flowers takes viewers to their childhood and the reverie of memories. Laurie Delk, sandiegouniontribune.com, "Wonderspaces art show returns to San Diego," 11 June 2018 Probably the most famous and frequently referenced example of this in literary history is Proust’s preoccupation with madeleines, the taste of which sends the narrator of Swann’s Way down a lengthy path of reverie. Alissa Wilkinson, Vox, "The delectable possibility and bland reality of Sweetbitter," 25 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'reverie.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of reverie

1654, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for reverie

French rêverie, from Middle French, delirium, from resver, rever to wander, be delirious

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Statistics for reverie

Last Updated

30 Jul 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for reverie

The first known use of reverie was in 1654

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More Definitions for reverie

reverie

noun

English Language Learners Definition of reverie

: a state in which you are thinking about pleasant things

reverie

noun
rev·er·ie | \ ˈre-və-rē \
plural reveries

Kids Definition of reverie

: the state of being lost in thought especially about pleasant things

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Comments on reverie

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the setting in which something occurs

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