resurgence

noun
re·​sur·​gence | \ ri-ˈsər-jən(t)s How to pronounce resurgence (audio) \

Definition of resurgence

: a rising again into life, activity, or prominence a resurgence of interest

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Examples of resurgence in a Sentence

There has been some resurgence in economic activity recently. the downtown has experienced a resurgence since the commercial revitalization project was completed
Recent Examples on the Web In an effort to prevent a resurgence of the virus in the region, New York, New Jersey and Connecticut issued a joint travel advisory requiring travelers from hotspots to quarantine for two weeks. Lazaro Gamio, New York Times, "How Coronavirus Cases Have Risen Since States Reopened," 9 July 2020 The inside was set to reopen last Thursday, but Gov. Gretchen Whitmer ordered bars to stop indoor bar service to prevent a resurgence of the coronavirus, effective at 11 p.m. July 1. Susan Selasky, Detroit Free Press, "2 more coronavirus positive cases linked to Royal Oak sports bar," 7 July 2020 South Korea is also among those countries seeking to prevent a resurgence of the outbreak, reporting 37 new cases of COVID-19 on Monday. BostonGlobe.com, "Europe reopens, Beijing outbreak revives need for vigilance," 15 June 2020 South Korea is also among those countries seeking to prevent a resurgence of the outbreak, reporting 37 new cases of COVID-19 on Monday. Ken Moritsugu, The Christian Science Monitor, "Virus outbreak in Beijing: a cautionary tale of reopening," 15 June 2020 The governor said the exclusion of bars and nightclubs from the new phase, for instance, was a precaution to prevent a resurgence that could cause another potential backtrack or even an outbreak. Kristina Vakhman, courant.com, "Phase 3 of Connecticut’s reopening plan began Thursday. Here’s what restrictions have been lifted.," 8 Oct. 2020 The goal was to prevent a resurgence of the pathogen. Matthew Dalton, WSJ, "Contact Tracing, the West’s Big Hope for Suppressing Covid-19, Is in Disarray," 17 Sep. 2020 Looking ahead, Moody's Analytics economists say the recovery will continue to depend on how state and local governments act to prevent a resurgence in the virus. Annalyn Kurtz, CNN, "Here's why some state economies are recovering faster than others," 16 Sep. 2020 Only continued social distancing can prevent the resurgence of disease in a city where only about 19 percent of people have antibodies against the virus, much lower than the estimates required for herd immunity. Joshua Austin Acklin, Scientific American, "New Yorkers Flattened the Curve, but ...," 9 July 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'resurgence.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of resurgence

1798, in the meaning defined above

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Time Traveler for resurgence

Time Traveler

The first known use of resurgence was in 1798

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Statistics for resurgence

Last Updated

14 Oct 2020

Cite this Entry

“Resurgence.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/resurgence. Accessed 25 Oct. 2020.

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More Definitions for resurgence

resurgence

noun
How to pronounce resurgence (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of resurgence

: a growth or increase that occurs after a period without growth or increase

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