rescind

verb
re·​scind | \ ri-ˈsind How to pronounce rescind (audio) \
rescinded; rescinding; rescinds

Definition of rescind

transitive verb

1 : to take away : remove
2a : take back, cancel refused to rescind the order
b : to abrogate (a contract) and restore the parties to the positions they would have occupied had there been no contract
3 : to make void by action of the enacting authority or a superior authority : repeal rescind an act

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Other Words from rescind

rescinder noun
rescindment \ ri-​ˈsin(d)-​mənt How to pronounce rescind (audio) \ noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for rescind

Synonyms

Antonyms

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Did You Know?

Rescind and the lesser-known words exscind and prescind all come from the Latin verb scindere, which means "to cut" or "to split." Rescind was adapted from its Latin predecessor rescindere in the second half of the 16th century, and prescind (from praescindere) and exscind (from exscindere) followed in the mid-17th century. Exscind means "to cut off" or "to excise," and prescind means "to withdraw one's attention," but neither appears frequently in contemporary English. Of the three borrowings, only rescind established itself as a common English term. You might hear of someone rescinding a contract or an offer, or of a legislative body rescinding a law.

Examples of rescind in a Sentence

The enemies these efforts made for him concocted charges of disloyalty, and following a hearing before the Atomic Energy Commission in 1954, Oppenheimer's security clearance was rescinded. — Kai Bird et al., Smithsonian, Aug. 2005 But Maria convinced Leverich that she had the authority to rescind the executor's decision to appoint him as biographer. — John Lahr, New Yorker, 19 Dec. 1994 The Navy barred its personnel from his church, but he challenged the decree in federal court as a constitutional violation of freedom of religion. Eventually, the Navy rescinded its ban. — Randall Samborn, National Law Journal, 14 Jan. 1991 The navy rescinded its ban on women sailors. The company later rescinded its offer.
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Recent Examples on the Web The university announced the change Tuesday in response to mounting pressure to rescind a requirement that all students, staff and faculty members be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 before returning to campus in the fall. Arika Herron, The Indianapolis Star, 1 June 2021 Flagstaff Mayor Paul Deasy announced Tuesday that the city’s face-covering proclamation that took effect June 20 would end Wednesday, and the county Board of Supervisors voted unanimously Tuesday to rescind the county’s mandate June 1. From Usa Today Network And Wire Reports, USA TODAY, 28 May 2021 After members voted to rescind the ban, the meeting broke up, with hard feelings all around. John Leland, New York Times, 28 May 2021 On May 14th, America’s biggest environmental regulator issued a notice to rescind new cost-benefit analysis requirements at its Office of Air and Radiation. James Broughel, Forbes, 28 May 2021 The Rock County Board debated for a couple of hours Thursday evening on whether to rescind the mandate. Drake Bentley, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 27 May 2021 Petitions asking the Nobel Committee to rescind the prize have garnered tens of thousands of signatures. Michelle Gulino And Malaak Jamal, CNN, 25 May 2021 DeWine recently abandoned his proposal to use a two-week rate of cases-per-100,000 residents for full reopening, vowing to rescind all public health orders when that number reached 50 cases per 100,000. cleveland, 20 May 2021 In 2017, opposition to a similar exchange led Indiana’s Lawrence County to rescind its program. Chris Kenning, The Courier-Journal, 7 May 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'rescind.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of rescind

1579, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for rescind

borrowed from Middle French & Latin; Middle French rescinder "to reduce, cut, cancel, break (a contract)," borrowed from Latin rescindere "to remove or lay bare by hewing and cutting, cut or tear open, cancel, annul," from re- re- + scindere "to split, cleave, separate" — more at shed entry 1

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Time Traveler for rescind

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The first known use of rescind was in 1579

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Last Updated

3 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Rescind.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/rescind. Accessed 15 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for rescind

rescind

verb

English Language Learners Definition of rescind

formal : to end (a law, contract, agreement, etc.) officially : to say officially that (something) is no longer valid

rescind

verb
re·​scind | \ ri-ˈsind How to pronounce rescind (audio) \

Legal Definition of rescind

transitive verb

1 : to take back and make void rescinded its suspension of his license
2 : to abrogate (a contract or transaction) by mutual agreement, judicial decree, or unilateral declaration because of fraud, mistake, duress, misrepresentation, illegality, a breach, or another sufficient ground with both parties restored to their positions before the contract was made — compare cancel, terminate
3 : to make void by the same or by a superior authority rescind a regulation

intransitive verb

: to rescind something (as a contract)

Other Words from rescind

rescindable \ -​ˈsin-​də-​bəl \ adjective

History and Etymology for rescind

Latin rescindere to cut loose, annul, from re- away, back + scindere to cut, split

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