reschedule

verb
re·​sched·​ule | \ (ˌ)rē-ˈske-(ˌ)jül How to pronounce reschedule (audio) , -jəl, Canadian also -ˈshe-, British usually -ˈshe-(ˌ)dyül \
rescheduled; rescheduling; reschedules

Definition of reschedule

transitive verb

: to schedule or plan again according to a different timetable especially : to defer required payment of (a debt or loan)

Examples of reschedule in a Sentence

She called to reschedule her appointment. The meeting was rescheduled for Tuesday. He rescheduled his college loans.
See More
Recent Examples on the Web The Bruins added a game against the Ducks at Matthew Knight Arena in Eugene on March 3 as part of the Pac-12 Conference’s efforts to reschedule games relevant to the regular-season championship and NCAA tournament selections. Los Angeles Times, "The Sports Report: Stumbling Lakers lose to Wizards in overtime," 23 Feb. 2021 Organizers initially hoped to reschedule it but were unable to do so. al, "Biloxi’s annual Crawfish Music Festival announces April lineup," 18 Feb. 2021 Staff will contact everyone who had appointments to reschedule them for another date, said Brian Terrett, a spokesman for Legacy Health, which is operating the site with other regional health care providers. oregonlive, "COVID vaccine site at Oregon Convention Center will be closed Friday due to Portland snow," 12 Feb. 2021 Initially, organizers had hoped to reschedule it for later in the year, but the coronavirus crisis only worsened. Beth Harris, SFChronicle.com, "Coronavirus concerns postpone SoCal’s BNP Paribas Open tennis tournament," 29 Dec. 2020 Arkansas had games postponed because of the virus during the regular season, but the Razorbacks were able to reschedule games and complete their 10-game schedule. Scottie Bordelon, Arkansas Online, "Razorbacks' bowl game called off," 29 Dec. 2020 Conference USA pushed back its title game from Dec. 5 to Dec. 18 to open up time for teams that have been forced to postpone games to reschedule them. Brett Vito, Denton Record-Chronicle, "UTEP suspends football activities, putting game against UNT in doubt," 29 Nov. 2020 The National Football League will reschedule the Pittsburgh-Tennessee game to later in the season after another Titans player and personnel member tested positive for Covid-19 Thursday, the league said in a statement. Bloomberg.com, "New York City Under Pressure; CDC Funds Stalled: Virus Update," 30 Sep. 2020 The health center encouraged anyone with an appointment at a closed site to reschedule it through the center's website. Helen Wieffering, The Arizona Republic, "Storm damages Phoenix-area 24-hour COVID-19 testing sites, cause brief stop to services," 19 Aug. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'reschedule.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of reschedule

1878, in the meaning defined above

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about reschedule

Time Traveler for reschedule

Time Traveler

The first known use of reschedule was in 1878

See more words from the same year

Statistics for reschedule

Last Updated

26 Feb 2021

Cite this Entry

“Reschedule.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/reschedule. Accessed 7 Mar. 2021.

Style: MLA
MLA Chicago APA Merriam-Webster

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for reschedule

reschedule

verb

English Language Learners Definition of reschedule

: to schedule (something) for a different time or date
: to arrange (a loan or debt) to be paid back at a later date than was originally planned

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on reschedule

What made you want to look up reschedule? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Who Knew?

Name That Thing

Test your visual vocabulary with our 10-question challenge!

TAKE THE QUIZ
Typeshift

Anagram puzzles meet word search.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!