requiem

noun
re·​qui·​em | \ ˈre-kwē-əm also ˈrā- or ˈrē- How to pronounce requiem (audio) \

Essential Meaning of requiem

1 : a Christian religious ceremony for a dead person
2 : a piece of music for a requiem

Full Definition of requiem

1 : a mass for the dead
2a : a solemn chant (such as a dirge) for the repose of the dead
b : something that resembles such a solemn chant
3a : a musical setting of the mass for the dead
b : a musical composition in honor of the dead

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Synonyms for requiem

Synonyms

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Examples of requiem in a Sentence

the choir will sing Mozart's Requiem
Recent Examples on the Web The English-language text of the requiem also will be projected onto the façade of the opera house during the performance. Jane Levere, Forbes, 11 Sep. 2021 The opening was meant to feature the Britten requiem with the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra from England, which premiered it in 1962, and its chorus, under its music director, Mirga Grazinyte-Tyla. New York Times, 25 July 2021 Listening to the episode, as the song’s bachata guitar and dembow drums slashed through each other under Ivy’s guttural wail, I was moved to stand up and belted her requiem of resentment and heartbreak to no one in particular. Isabelia Herrera, New York Times, 11 Aug. 2021 His requiem Mass was held several days later at St. William of York Church on Cook’s Lane in Ten Hills. Jacques Kelly, baltimoresun.com, 31 July 2021 The scene feels like a requiem, or an offering — a paying of respects to the departed. BostonGlobe.com, 25 June 2021 Her third album – a requiem for her deceased younger brother – is rooted in the mournful and spiritual traditions of ghazal and qawwali music. Stephen Humphries, The Christian Science Monitor, 23 June 2021 But Roadrunner, steeped in the jittery punk-rock style and verve of its famously omnivorous muse, registers as more than a requiem or a postscript. Leah Greenblatt, EW.com, 12 June 2021 Is this a requiem for the American family, or a hymn to its battered resilience? Los Angeles Times, 13 May 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'requiem.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of requiem

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for requiem

Middle English, from Latin (first word of the introit of the requiem mass), accusative of requies rest, from re- + quies quiet, rest — more at while

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Time Traveler for requiem

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The first known use of requiem was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near requiem

request note

requiem

requiem shark

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Last Updated

21 Sep 2021

Cite this Entry

“Requiem.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/requiem. Accessed 25 Oct. 2021.

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More Definitions for requiem

requiem

noun
re·​qui·​em | \ ˈre-kwē-əm How to pronounce requiem (audio) \

Kids Definition of requiem

1 : a mass for a dead person
2 : a musical service or hymn in honor of dead people

More from Merriam-Webster on requiem

Nglish: Translation of requiem for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of requiem for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about requiem

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