reorder

1 of 2

verb

re·​or·​der (ˌ)rē-ˈȯr-dər How to pronounce reorder (audio)
reordered; reordering; reorders

transitive verb

1
: to arrange in a different way
2
: to give a reorder for

intransitive verb

: to place a reorder

reorder

2 of 2

noun

: an order like a previous order placed with the same supplier

Examples of reorder in a Sentence

Verb I had to reorder the shirt because they sent the wrong size. The book sold out the first day, and the store reordered 500 copies. Call us when you're ready to reorder. You need to reorder your priorities. The coach reordered the batting lineup. After her husband's death, she reordered her life.
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
Ryuichi responded to that by reordering certain songs. Todd Gilchrist, Variety, 15 Mar. 2024 Walmart knows this, which is why the retailer has introduced voice shopping as an easier way for customers to reorder common items. Bernard Marr, Forbes, 15 Feb. 2024 The conversation among the panelists, which took place by video conference on Jan. 3, has been edited and condensed for clarity, with some material reordered or added from follow-up interviews. Emily Bazelon, New York Times, 1 Feb. 2024 This conversation has been edited and condensed for clarity, with some material reordered and added from follow-up interviews. Emily Bazelon, New York Times, 20 Nov. 2023 The draft upset people because in it Lowell borrowed heavily from letters sent to him by his former wife, Elizabeth Hardwick, herself a formidable writer; attributed to the poem’s version of Hardwick statements the real Hardwick hadn’t made; and reordered the sequence of events in their divorce. Willing Davidson, The New Yorker, 4 Dec. 2023 Keep an eye on Amazon’s fluid pricing when reordering to make sure the cost did not unnecessarily get jacked up. Kurt Knutsson, Fox News, 28 Sep. 2023 How would states and municipalities have to reorder their behaviors? Fred Barbash, Washington Post, 1 Dec. 2023 Outside, the property’s 624 acres are populated by deer, ocelots and snakes that roam through gardens of Kalach’s own design; here as elsewhere, the architect’s approach to landscaping is hands-off, focused on reordering existing vegetation and grouping similar species together. Suleman Anaya Fabian Martinez, New York Times, 20 Sep. 2023
Noun
With a simple text chat powered by conversational AI technology, customers can search for items, add or remove products from their cart, reorder products, and schedule a delivery or pickup. Bernard Marr, Forbes, 15 Feb. 2024 One tactic was to reorder customer transactions from largest to smallest, rather than processing them in chronological order, so fees piled up because account balances fell faster. Teri Sforza, Hartford Courant, 16 Jan. 2024 But falling temperatures late in the year reorder a ringneck’s priorities. Phil Bourjaily, Field & Stream, 3 Jan. 2024 For example, machine learning algorithms analyze past data and current conditions to advise the best times and places to reorder, transfer, or store items. Paul J. Noble, Forbes, 29 Nov. 2023 But most AIs are not trained specifically to reorder book pages, or to analyze the linguistic quirks of 1930s English. Kenna Hughes-Castleberry, Scientific American, 21 Apr. 2023 The painting suggests foreign power on its way to reorder society. Taína Caragol, Smithsonian Magazine, 8 Aug. 2023 But that policy caused some problems last weekend as the thieving birds’ antics led to the kitchen being overwhelmed with reorders. Nick Stoico, BostonGlobe.com, 27 July 2023 Because remembering to reorder cartridges isn’t for everyone, the Thermacell perimeter system is a hassle-free alternative that provides continuous power to keep mosquitoes away for about 6.5 hours. John Sass, Field & Stream, 11 Apr. 2023

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'reorder.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

First Known Use

Verb

1579, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

1883, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of reorder was in 1579

Dictionary Entries Near reorder

Cite this Entry

“Reorder.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/reorder. Accessed 22 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

reorder

1 of 2 verb
re·​or·​der (ˈ)rē-ˈȯrd-ər How to pronounce reorder (audio)
1
: to arrange in a different way
2
: to place a reorder

reorder

2 of 2 noun
: an order like a previous order placed with the same supplier

More from Merriam-Webster on reorder

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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