remold

verb

re·​mold (ˌ)rē-ˈmōld How to pronounce remold (audio)
variants US remold or chiefly British remould
remolded; remolding

transitive verb

: to mold (something or someone) again : reshape
heat used to remold plastic
… the idea that humans can be remoulded by their environment …Ed West
A once preppy college is remolding itself, and today almost 25 percent of the students … are minorities.S. Reeves

Examples of remold in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Over the next half century, Americans sought to remold Cuba to their taste and convenience. Jon Lee Anderson, Foreign Affairs, 14 Dec. 2021 An initial geological study and work to shore things up cost the city $75,000, but those temporary repairs and efforts to remold the slope didn’t stabilize the soil enough. Erika I. Ritchie, Orange County Register, 25 Feb. 2024 Advertisement Power and responsibility didn’t remold the man, or summon deep reserves of character and wisdom. Mark Z. Barabak, Los Angeles Times, 3 Oct. 2023 Beijing’s desire to expand BRICS is part of a wider effort by Xi to remold international systems to accommodate Beijing’s interests. Christian Shepherd, Washington Post, 23 Aug. 2023 For Beijing and Moscow, adding members is part of a long-running — and often frustrated — effort to turn a largely symbolic grouping into a vehicle for remolding international trade and finance structures to protect their interests against future sanctions from the United States and its allies. Christian Shepherd, Washington Post, 24 Aug. 2023 And actively changing those works — continually remolding them into a shape that suits today’s market — eventually compromises the entire archival record of our culture; we’re left only with evidence of the present, not a document of the past. Niela Orr, New York Times, 6 July 2023 Carrasquilla’s ouster came as Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis is championing efforts to remold the state’s education system, including imposing a ban on lessons about gender identity and sexuality at public schools. Kelsey Ables, Washington Post, 29 Apr. 2023 Soaked in hormones that relax the tendons and ligaments, the joints in the pelvis loosen and the shape of the foot is remolded under greater weight. Alexandra Kleeman, New York Times, 21 Apr. 2023

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'remold.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

First Known Use

1600, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of remold was in 1600

Dictionary Entries Near remold

Cite this Entry

“Remold.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/remold. Accessed 24 Jun. 2024.

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