reinterpret

verb
re·​in·​ter·​pret | \ ˌrē-ən-ˈtər-prət How to pronounce reinterpret (audio) , -pət \
reinterpreted; reinterpreting; reinterprets

Definition of reinterpret

transitive verb

: to interpret again specifically : to give a new or different interpretation to

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Other Words from reinterpret

reinterpretation \ ˌrē-​ən-​ˌtər-​prə-​ˈtā-​shən How to pronounce reinterpretation (audio) , -​pə-​ \ noun

Examples of reinterpret in a Sentence

New information may force us to reinterpret the evidence. The director wants to reinterpret the old play for a modern audience.
Recent Examples on the Web So in theory, the Federal Communications Commission might have jurisdiction to reinterpret it. Timothy B. Lee And Kate Cox, Ars Technica, "Trump is desperate to punish Big Tech but has no good way to do it," 29 May 2020 Each new phase was a welcomed surprise and an opportunity to reinterpret our new reality. Todd Heisler, New York Times, "Witnessing Pandemic New York, With an Ear to the Past," 21 Aug. 2020 So, to reinterpret the songs with the more seasoned voice that was a great thrill. Jordan Runtagh, PEOPLE.com, "Rufus Wainwright Talks New Album Unfollow the Rules and Revisiting His Past," 31 July 2020 The legal authority of the order, which aims to reinterpret a law that shields websites and tech companies from lawsuits, remains in dispute. Julia Horowitz, CNN, "Hertz tried to sell stock after going bankrupt. Here's what that tells us," 19 June 2020 Trump's plan is for the Department of Commerce—which does report to Trump—to petition the FCC to reinterpret Section 230. Timothy B. Lee And Kate Cox, Ars Technica, "Trump is desperate to punish Big Tech but has no good way to do it," 29 May 2020 The centerpiece of Trump's executive order is a plan to reinterpret a 1996 law that has been instrumental in the growth of the Internet economy. Timothy B. Lee And Kate Cox, Ars Technica, "Trump is desperate to punish Big Tech but has no good way to do it," 29 May 2020 In plain language, however, the president is attempting to use his executive power to reinterpret an act of Congress – and that act of Congress just so happens to be the law that made the modern internet possible. David French, Time, "Donald Trump's Dangerous Attack on Free Speech Online," 29 May 2020 Nor will attempting to reinterpret medical realities make the virus disappear. Josh Petri, Bloomberg.com, "Climate and Pandemic Models Speak Louder Than Words," 12 May 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'reinterpret.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of reinterpret

1611, in the meaning defined above

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Time Traveler for reinterpret

Time Traveler

The first known use of reinterpret was in 1611

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Statistics for reinterpret

Last Updated

10 Sep 2020

Cite this Entry

“Reinterpret.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/reinterpret. Accessed 23 Sep. 2020.

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More Definitions for reinterpret

reinterpret

verb
How to pronounce reinterpret (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of reinterpret

: to understand and explain or show (something) in a new or different way

More from Merriam-Webster on reinterpret

Nglish: Translation of reinterpret for Spanish Speakers

Comments on reinterpret

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