recidivist

noun
re·cid·i·vist | \ ri-ˈsi-də-vist \

Definition of recidivist 

: one who relapses specifically : a habitual criminal

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Other words from recidivist

recidivist adjective
recidivistic \ri-ˌsi-də-ˈvi-stik \ adjective

Examples of recidivist in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web

Jarvis Taylor had three prior felony convictions, leading the DA’s office to charge him under Georgia’s recidivist law. Bill Rankin, ajc, "Georgia juries are left in the dark when it comes to punishment," 8 June 2018 The ProPublica analysis of 7,000 individuals arrested in Broward Country, Florida revealed that this risk assessment tool wrongly identified African-American defendants as potential recidivists at improperly high rates. Peter J. Beshar, Fortune, "Commentary: Atlanta’s Cyber Attack Shows the New Security Risks the U.S. Needs to Address—and Fast," 28 Mar. 2018 The government evaluates each case individually and reserves the right to take action against the low-priority misconduct in appropriate cases — for example, in a case involving a recidivist offender or an otherwise hardcore criminal. Andrew C. Mccarthy, National Review, "DACA: Trump Does the Full Obama on Prosecutorial Discretion," 9 Sep. 2017 However, identification is only the first step in breaking the recidivist cycle. WSJ, "Is Wider DNA Testing a Solution or Abuse?," 8 Aug. 2017 So the board considers him to be, like Jesse James, Al Capone and John Dillinger, a dangerous recidivist. George Will, Twin Cities, "George Will: Engineering without a license," 13 June 2017 The focus then was on people who had aggravated felony convictions or who were recidivists. Tessa Berenson, Time, "Immigration Raids Are Sweeping Up More People Who Weren't Targets," 9 Aug. 2017 There’s a hitch to making Wells Fargo the lead example of banning corporate recidivists. David Dayen, New Republic, "Give Wells Fargo the Corporate Death Penalty," 1 Aug. 2017 So the board considers him to be, like Jesse James, Al Capone and John Dillinger, a dangerous recidivist. George Will, Twin Cities, "George Will: Engineering without a license," 13 June 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'recidivist.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of recidivist

1867, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for recidivist

French récidiviste, from récidiver to relapse, from Middle French, from Medieval Latin recidivare, from Latin recidivus recurring, from recidere to fall back, from re- + cadere to fall — more at chance

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Time Traveler for recidivist

The first known use of recidivist was in 1867

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More Definitions for recidivist

recidivist

noun

English Language Learners Definition of recidivist

: a person who continues to commit crimes even after being caught and punished

recidivist

noun
re·cid·i·vist | \ -vəst \

Medical Definition of recidivist 

: one who relapses into a previous behavior or condition especially : a habitual criminal

Other words from recidivist

recidivist adjective
recidivistic \-ˌsid-ə-ˈvis-tik \ adjective

recidivist

noun
re·cid·i·vist | \ ri-ˈsi-də-vist \

Legal Definition of recidivist 

: an habitual criminal

Other words from recidivist

recidivist adjective
recidivistic \ri-ˌsi-də-ˈvis-tik \ adjective

More from Merriam-Webster on recidivist

Spanish Central: Translation of recidivist

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