pulp

noun
\ ˈpəlp \

Definition of pulp

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a(1) : the soft, succulent part of a fruit usually composed of mesocarp
(2) : stem pith when soft and spongy
b : a soft mass of vegetable matter (as of apples) from which most of the water has been extracted by pressure
c : the soft sensitive tissue that fills the central cavity of a tooth — see tooth illustration
d : a material prepared by chemical or mechanical means from various materials (such as wood or rags) for use in making paper and cellulose products
2 : pulverized ore mixed with water
3a : pulpy condition or character
b : something in such a condition or having such a character
4 : a magazine or book printed on cheap paper (such as newsprint) and often dealing with sensational material also : sensational or tabloid writing often used attributively pulp fiction

pulp

verb
pulped; pulping; pulps

Definition of pulp (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to reduce to pulp pulped unsold copies of the book
2 : to cause to appear pulpy
3 : to deprive of the pulp

intransitive verb

: to become pulp or pulpy

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Other Words from pulp

Noun

pulpiness \ ˈpəl-​pē-​nəs \ noun
pulpy \ ˈpəl-​pē \ adjective

Verb

pulper noun

Synonyms for pulp

Synonyms: Verb

crush, mash, squash

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Examples of pulp in a Sentence

Noun

The fruit has sweet, juicy pulp and hard, black seeds. the pulp of an orange I like to strain the pulp out of my orange juice. The grain was mashed into pulp. The boxes will be turned back into pulp and be made into newspapers. This paper is made from inexpensive wood pulp. He made a little extra money by writing stories for a science fiction pulp.

Verb

pulped three oranges to get their juice
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Bieber thinks the calculation should be made on a wider range of greenhouse-gas releases that includes the pulp mills as well as all those included in the state’s annual tally. Hal Bernton, The Seattle Times, "Who would pay a state carbon fee on November ballot, and who gets a pass?," 17 Sep. 2018 By the 1930s, pulp writers, playwrights and Hollywood had taken up this version of the undead. Peter Saenger, WSJ, "Inspired by Zombies," 21 Dec. 2018 Rinse seeds under cold water, discarding pulp and strings. Heather Finn, Good Housekeeping, "How to Roast Pumpkin Seeds for the Perfect Fall Snack," 21 Nov. 2018 What new molecules would the blueberry pulp reactions form? Laura Yan, Popular Mechanics, "What If the Earth Was Made Out of Blueberries?," 5 Aug. 2018 What those worlds look like—be they cyborg-centric, egalitarian, or dystopian—varies, from a 1930s pulp tale by C.L. Moore to a piece by the late, great Ursula K. LeGuin penned at the end of the 60s. Cady Drell, Marie Claire, "The Best Sci Fi Movies of 2018 That Starred Women," 28 Nov. 2018 The subject matter is depressing, but the storytelling is addicting — like good, page-turning pulp. Noel Murray, The Verge, "This weekend, stream some ‘Nordic noir’ on Netflix, starting with Deadwind," 9 Nov. 2018 Some Michigan trees that are harvested get turned into pulp, which is used to make such fabrics as rayon and the trendy Tencel. Michigan Department Of Natural Resource, Detroit Free Press, "Ensuring the future of Michigan's forests," 16 Jan. 2018 The Gatling owes a lot of its fame to its unique operation and appearance, one cemented in the public imagination first through Buffalo Bill's Wild West Shows and later through comics, pulp fiction, and countless films. Matthew Moss, Popular Mechanics, "The Story of the Gatling Gun," 22 Aug. 2016

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Southern yellow pine, which is sawed into lumber and pulped into paper and particle board, is one of the region’s top agricultural products. Ryan Dezember, WSJ, "Stressed Southern Timber Growers Get Hit Again," 27 Oct. 2018 But tons and tons of books are discarded globally each year, either pulped by publishers, shredded by libraries or tossed out when people empty old houses. Jason Daley, Smithsonian, "Turkish Garbage Collectors Curate Their Own Library," 23 Feb. 2018 Word was, he had been ordered, at the last minute, to pulp the first run of booklets and to rush out new versions, stripped of cost calculations. William Finnegan, The New Yorker, "Can Andy Byford Save the Subways?," 2 July 2018 If the asteroid is large enough, the overpressure would effectively pulp victims' insides. Jasper Hamill, Fox News, "7 terrifying ways that asteroids could wipe out life on our planet revealed," 28 June 2018 After the wood is pulped, it’s turned into a fiber that is then spun into a yarn. Anh-minh Le, San Francisco Chronicle, "Latest Allbirds shoes do actually grow on trees," 18 Apr. 2018 In the second half of the century, entire libraries were transferred to microform, spun on microfilm reels, or served on tiny microfiche platters, while the crumbling originals were thrown away or pulped. Maria Bustillos, Longreads, "The Internet Isn’t Forever," 20 Feb. 2018 Pulping wood turned out to be not all that different from refining oil. Christopher Leonard, chicagotribune.com, "A look at how Koch does business," 5 July 2017 In Sumatra and Borneo, forests have been pulped to make way for palm oil plantations, with devastating consequences for orangutans. Natalie Angier, New York Times, "Do Gorillas Even Belong in Zoos? Harambe’s Death Spurs Debate," 6 June 2016

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'pulp.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of pulp

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a(1)

Verb

1683, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for pulp

Noun

Middle English pulpe, from Latin pulpa flesh, pulp

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Statistics for pulp

Last Updated

16 Jan 2019

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Time Traveler for pulp

The first known use of pulp was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for pulp

pulp

noun

English Language Learners Definition of pulp

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the inner, juicy part of a fruit or vegetable

: the substance that is left after the liquid has been squeezed from a fruit or vegetable

: a soft, wet substance that is made by crushing something

pulp

verb

English Language Learners Definition of pulp (Entry 2 of 2)

: to crush (something) until it is soft and wet : to make (something) into pulp

pulp

noun
\ ˈpəlp \

Kids Definition of pulp

1 : the soft juicy or moist part of a fruit or vegetable the pulp of an orange
2 : the part of a fruit or vegetable that is left after the liquid has been squeezed from it apple pulp
3 : a material prepared usually from wood or rags and used in making paper
4 : the soft sensitive tissue inside a tooth
5 : a seriously injured or damaged state He was beaten to a pulp.

pulp

noun
\ ˈpəlp \

Medical Definition of pulp

: a mass of soft tissue: as
b : the characteristic somewhat spongy tissue of the spleen
c : the fleshy portion of the fingertip

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More from Merriam-Webster on pulp

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with pulp

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for pulp

Spanish Central: Translation of pulp

Nglish: Translation of pulp for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of pulp for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about pulp

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