public transit

noun
variants: US public transit or British public transport

Definition of public transit

: mass transit public transit remains the smartest way to navigate hectic downtowns.National Geographer Traveler … jobs restoring our water sewage systems, our highways and bridges, our public transit system and our crumbling schools, ports and public buildings.— Ralph Nader

Examples of public transit in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web The stubbornly high case numbers meant that in the U.K., visits to supermarkets and workplaces and trips on public transit suffered more than in other G-7 countries, intensifying the economic damage. Andrew Barnett, WSJ, "British Economy, Post-Brexit and Pummeled by Covid, Is Worst in G-7," 25 Jan. 2021 The government has been gradually easing restrictions on public transit in metro Manila since June. New York Times, "When the Trains Stopped, Cyclists Dodged Manila’s Choking Traffic," 13 Dec. 2020 Germany is now requiring that people wear medical-grade face masks (like N95s or surgical masks) on public transit or to grocery stores, reports The Washington Post. Elizabeth Gulino, refinery29.com, "Do You Need To Wear Two Masks?," 25 Jan. 2021 In New York, where there’s little by way of secure bike parking to speak of, most riders—including delivery drivers and people in areas underserved by public transit—lock up their e-bike on the street and hope for the best. Patrick Lucas Austin, Time, "E-Bikes Are Taking Off—But We Need to Make Space for Them," 22 Jan. 2021 And cities and states sunk into their own financial crises, threatening government subsidies for public transit systems. New York Times, "‘Existential Peril’: Mass Transit Faces Huge Service Cuts Across U.S.," 6 Dec. 2020 Act containing unemployment assistance, business loans and grants, and aid to state and local governments and public transit systems. Taylor Deville, baltimoresun.com, "Baltimore County seeks to refinance $3 billion in unsold bonds, issue millions for school, infrastructure projects," 1 Dec. 2020 Public health experts say traveling, especially in airports or by public transit, is inherently risky when COVID-19 infections are high, and colleges are discouraging students from shuttling back and forth in the coming weeks. Chicago Tribune Staff, chicagotribune.com, "Coronavirus in Illinois updates: Here’s what’s happening Tuesday with COVID-19 in the Chicago area," 17 Nov. 2020 Tempe has one of the Valley's most robust public transit systems, but residents could see fewer bus routes, new fares and the end of a popular bike event as the city seeks to cut transportation costs over the next three years. Paulina Pineda, The Arizona Republic, "Tempe may cut some bus services and other transit expenses. Here's what to expect.," 29 Oct. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'public transit.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of public transit

1847, in the meaning defined above

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Time Traveler for public transit

Time Traveler

The first known use of public transit was in 1847

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Statistics for public transit

Last Updated

22 Feb 2021

Cite this Entry

“Public transit.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/public%20transit. Accessed 5 Mar. 2021.

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