pompous

adjective

pomp·​ous ˈpäm-pəs How to pronounce pompous (audio)
1
: excessively elevated or ornate
pompous rhetoric
2
: having or exhibiting self-importance : arrogant
a pompous politician
3
: relating to or suggestive of pomp or splendor : magnificent
pompously adverb
pompousness noun

Examples of pompous in a Sentence

So as the pictures of flooded shanties flicker by on cable news, uptight neatnik Midwestern Lutherans and sensitive northeastern urban sophisticates and pompous media grandees on both coasts express shock at the unexpected squalor of the poverty and bafflement over the slovenly corruption of the civic institutions. Rob Long, National Review, 26 Sept. 2005
President Warren Harding was an orator, but his bloviations were an army of pompous phrases moving across the landscape in search of an idea. Harold Evans, New York Times Book Review, 11 Nov. 2001
She never allowed her spirit to become, as, say, Henry Adams did, curdled by long exposure to Washington's tawdry and pompous aspects. George F. Will, Newsweek, 24 May 1999
She found it difficult to talk about her achievements without sounding pompous. the pompous waiter served us in the manner of a person doing some poor soul a great favor
Recent Examples on the Web This pompous behavior is a textbook trait of NPD.1 6. Catherine Dibenedetto, Health, 19 Mar. 2024 Johnson crafted a subtle gesture of self-love — not pompous or vain, but simple and resolute. Entertainment & Arts The Huntington was gifted four major paintings this year. Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times, 1 Mar. 2024 If the dominant Spaniards of The Betrothed are unjust, self-interested, and pompous, few of the Italians — including churchmen — are any better. David Harsanyi, National Review, 25 Jan. 2024 One of the most memorable chapters epitomizes her detestation for the ultra-wealthy and pompous intellectuals who rushed to rationalize her work. Carlos Aguilar, Variety, 20 Jan. 2024 There were pompous society dowagers with melting faces, young beauties with speckled dresses, unexpected sphinxes and nature spirits. Will Heinrich, New York Times, 6 Feb. 2024 To the Rio waterfront, for one, where the pompous Nigel (Jemaine Clement) is quoting Shakespeare, decrying the carnival sideshow he’s chained to and deflecting the unwanted attention of his terribly annoying, terribly adoring fan, Gabi. Miami Staff, Miami Herald, 30 Jan. 2024 In the aforementioned Halloween episode, Ted and Blaire end up at the home of Claire’s pompous English professor (Josh Stamberg). Chris Vognar, Rolling Stone, 11 Jan. 2024 But what makes Babbitt a Babbitt is his pompous hypocrisy. Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times, 5 Dec. 2023

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'pompous.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

see pomp

First Known Use

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of pompous was in the 15th century

Dictionary Entries Near pompous

Cite this Entry

“Pompous.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pompous. Accessed 16 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

pompous

adjective
pomp·​ous ˈpäm-pəs How to pronounce pompous (audio)
1
: making a show of importance or dignity
a pompous manner
2
: having an overly high opinion of one's importance
a pompous politician
pompously adverb
pompousness noun

More from Merriam-Webster on pompous

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