politico

noun
po·​lit·​i·​co | \ pə-ˈli-ti-ˌkō How to pronounce politico (audio) \
plural politicos also politicoes

Definition of politico

Examples of politico in a Sentence

a politico who will do anything to win an election
Recent Examples on the Web President Biden wasn’t the only politico to catch the coronavirus in the last week. Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times, 26 July 2022 The lifeless bodies of longtime teacher Joyce Sheridan and her Republican politico husband John Patrick Sheridan Jr. were discovered in the bedroom of their home in the early morning hours of Sept. 28, 2014. Stephanie Pagones, Fox News, 1 July 2022 The lifeless bodies of longtime teacher Joyce Sheridan and her Republican politico husband John Patrick Sheridan Jr. were discovered in the bedroom of their Montgomery Township, New Jersey, home in the early morning hours of Sept. 28, 2014. Fox News, 24 June 2022 Bush Senior isn't the only politico to have recognized Molina's. Emma Balter, Chron, 23 June 2022 Rosen and other insiders, who spoke to Variety on condition of anonymity, also point to a swell of politico-cultural changes within China that have been bubbling under for four or five years and which are now manifesting themselves clearly. Patrick Frater, Variety, 19 May 2022 And former national security advisor Bolton isn't the only politico to have schmoozed at Kenny & Ziggy's. Emma Balter, Chron, 18 May 2022 The third race with a candidate backed by Abdur-Rahman is Sonya Russell-Ofchus, who is running for commission chair against long-time local politico and current chair Robb Pitts. Ben Brasch, ajc, 21 May 2022 The local mayor is a right-wing politico with national ambitions and a nationalistic credo. Joe Leydon, Variety, 6 May 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'politico.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of politico

1630, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for politico

borrowed from Italian politico and Spanish político, both derivatives of the corresponding adjectives politico and político "political," borrowed from Latin polīticus "of civil government, political" — more at politic

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Time Traveler for politico

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The first known use of politico was in 1630

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Dictionary Entries Near politico

politicness

politico

politics

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Statistics for politico

Last Updated

4 Aug 2022

Cite this Entry

“Politico.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/politico. Accessed 15 Aug. 2022.

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Britannica English: Translation of politico for Arabic Speakers

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