pelvis

noun
pel·vis | \ˈpel-vəs \
plural pelvises\ˈpel-və-səz \ or pelves\ˈpel-ˌvēz \

Definition of pelvis 

1 : a basin-shaped structure in the skeleton of many vertebrates that is formed by the pelvic girdle and adjoining bones of the spine

2 : the cavity of the pelvis

Examples of pelvis in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web

Kayden's injuries include fractures to his pelvis and cervical spine, as well as intracranial bleeding. Elizabeth Zwirz, Fox News, "Charges filed against Minnesota driver who allegedly didn't slow before hitting kids in park," 13 June 2018 Shultz suffered a broken arm and broken pelvis and has staples in her skull after being clipped by a revolving door and sent tumbling down stairs and into a concrete wall in New York recently. Carolyne Zinko, San Francisco Chronicle, "After 51 years serving SF, protocol queen Charlotte Shultz undaunted by elections, cancer," 29 May 2018 Her husband's pelvis and ribs were fractured and Aya's head was thrown into the windshield. Tom Hallman Jr., OregonLive.com, "The meaning of a mother's love through a doctor's diary: Tom Hallman," 12 May 2018 Low back problems are typically because the pelvis is off. Joyce Wiswell For The Knee Institute, Detroit Free Press, "Hands-on care makes all the difference," 10 Apr. 2018 Titanium screws hold his fractured pelvis together. Mike Hendricks, kansascity, "Firefighters protect us. Who protects them?," 13 July 2018 He is said to have sent a dead gopher to a publisher and attacked an ABC executive, breaking his pelvis. Richard Sandomir, BostonGlobe.com, "Harlan Ellison, pugnacious and prolific science fiction writer, dies at 84," 30 June 2018 He is said to have sent a dead gopher to a publisher and attacked an ABC executive, breaking his pelvis. Richard Sandomir, New York Times, "Harlan Ellison, Intensely Prolific Science Fiction Writer, Dies at 84," 29 June 2018 Its skeleton, recovered by archaeologists and belonging to the extinct species Dama dama geiselana (a different member of which is pictured above), shows an 11-millimeter, circular wound at the top of its pelvis, right next to its spine. Lizzie Wade, Science | AAAS, "Ancient deer skeleton may reveal how Neanderthals hunted prey," 25 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'pelvis.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of pelvis

1615, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for pelvis

New Latin, from Latin, basin; perhaps akin to Old English & Old Norse full cup

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Statistics for pelvis

Last Updated

15 Oct 2018

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Time Traveler for pelvis

The first known use of pelvis was in 1615

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More Definitions for pelvis

pelvis

noun

English Language Learners Definition of pelvis

: the wide curved bones between the spine and the leg bones

pelvis

noun
pel·vis | \ˈpel-vəs \

Kids Definition of pelvis

: the bowl-shaped part of the skeleton that includes the hip bones and the lower bones of the backbone

pelvis

noun
pel·vis | \ˈpel-vəs \
plural pelvises\-və-səz \ or pelves\-ˌvēz \

Medical Definition of pelvis 

1 : a basin-shaped structure in the skeleton of many vertebrates that is formed by the pelvic girdle together with the sacrum and often various coccygeal and caudal vertebrae and that in humans is composed of the two hip bones bounding it on each side and in front while the sacrum and coccyx complete it behind

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More from Merriam-Webster on pelvis

Spanish Central: Translation of pelvis

Nglish: Translation of pelvis for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of pelvis for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about pelvis

Comments on pelvis

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