patron

noun
pa·​tron | \ ˈpā-trən , for sense 6 also pa-ˈtrōⁿ \

Definition of patron

1a : a person chosen, named, or honored as a special guardian, protector, or supporter a patron of the arts
b : a wealthy or influential supporter of an artist or writer … the unspoken contract between artist and patron— D. D. R. Owen
c : a social or financial sponsor of a social function (such as a ball or concert) a patron of the annual masked ball
2 : one that uses wealth or influence to help an individual, an institution, or a cause a patron of the city library
3 : one who buys the goods or uses the services offered especially by an establishment a restaurant's patrons
4 : the holder of the right of presentation to an English ecclesiastical benefice
5 : a master in ancient times who freed his slave but retained some rights over him
6 [ French, from Middle French ] : the proprietor of an establishment (such as an inn) especially in France
7 : the chief male officer in some fraternal lodges having both men and women members

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Other Words from patron

patronal \ ˈpā-​trə-​nᵊl ; British  pə-​ˈtrō-​nᵊl , pa-​ \ adjective

Synonyms for patron

Synonyms

account, client, customer, guest, punter [chiefly British]

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Examples of patron in a Sentence

She is a well-known patron of the arts. the wealthy philanthropist is one of the city's most generous patrons of its symphony orchestra

Recent Examples on the Web

Helmed by Executive Director Helen Allen and Associate Executive Director Michael Diaz-Griffith, the event celebrated its 65th anniversary this year thanks to its many antiquarian patrons. Elise Taylor, Vogue, "Oldies but Goodies: The 10 Standout Antiques from The Winter Show," 18 Jan. 2019 Stepping out to visit Smart Works for the first time since being announced as their royal patron, Meghan stunned in a coat by Oscar de la Renta. Amy Mackelden, Harper's BAZAAR, "Meghan Markle Stuns in Oscar de la Renta for Official Visit as the Royal Patron of Smart Works," 10 Jan. 2019 Often absent, Bernhardt’s mother likely pimped her to wealthy patrons. Rachel Shteir, WSJ, "‘Playing to the Gods’ Review: Avatars of Female Anguish," 23 Aug. 2018 Among the motley crew from New York, Boston, Cincinnati, and Seattle, who ranged in age and marital status, were some of Kluger's most devoted patrons. Pilar Guzmán, Condé Nast Traveler, "South Africa’s Other Big Five," 20 Dec. 2018 On the day of my visit, the venue is bustling with empty-stomached patrons, some clad in suits, others in hoodies, surveying the scene in deep contemplation. Bethany Biron, Vox, "The food court’s younger, hipper cousin is a curated version of the mall staple.," 30 Oct. 2018 Staff now have more opportunities to have positive interactions with patrons, Kambitsch said. Cornelius Frolik, ajc, "Since Ohio library ended late fees, more materials getting returned," 6 July 2018 That first year of Dance in the Parks included four performances — three, actually, since one scheduled for the Midway Plaisance ice rink was rained out — reaching a total of about 200 patrons. Lauren Warnecke, chicagotribune.com, "Dance in the Parks is back for 10th summer. It may be first time you've seen modern dance — so 'it has to be good'," 3 July 2018 But with patrons such as Benjamin Franklin Washington, editor of the then-openly racist San Francisco Examiner, Brown lived with the grinding daily risk of exposure. Christopher Knight, latimes.com, "Grafton Tyler Brown's California scenes at Pasadena museum's final show," 30 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'patron.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of patron

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for patron

Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin & Latin; Medieval Latin patronus patron saint, patron of a benefice, pattern, from Latin, defender, from patr-, pater

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Statistics for patron

Last Updated

3 Feb 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for patron

The first known use of patron was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for patron

patron

noun

English Language Learners Definition of patron

: a person who gives money and support to an artist, organization, etc.
somewhat formal : a person who buys the goods or uses the services of a business, library, etc.

patron

noun
pa·​tron | \ ˈpā-trən \

Kids Definition of patron

1 : a person who gives generous support or approval
2 : customer

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More from Merriam-Webster on patron

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with patron

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for patron

Spanish Central: Translation of patron

Nglish: Translation of patron for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of patron for Arabic Speakers

Comments on patron

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