patron

noun
pa·​tron | \ ˈpā-trən How to pronounce patron (audio) , for sense 6 also pa-ˈtrōⁿ How to pronounce patron (audio) \

Definition of patron

1a : a person chosen, named, or honored as a special guardian, protector, or supporter a patron of the arts
b : a wealthy or influential supporter of an artist or writer … the unspoken contract between artist and patron— D. D. R. Owen
c : a social or financial sponsor of a social function (such as a ball or concert) a patron of the annual masked ball
2 : one that uses wealth or influence to help an individual, an institution, or a cause a patron of the city library
3 : one who buys the goods or uses the services offered especially by an establishment a restaurant's patrons
4 : the holder of the right of presentation to an English ecclesiastical benefice
5 : a master in ancient times who freed his slave but retained some rights over him
6 [ French, from Middle French ] : the proprietor of an establishment (such as an inn) especially in France
7 : the chief male officer in some fraternal lodges having both men and women members

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Other Words from patron

patronal \ ˈpā-​trə-​nᵊl How to pronounce patronal (audio) ; British  pə-​ˈtrō-​nᵊl , pa-​ \ adjective

Synonyms for patron

Synonyms

account, client, customer, guest, punter [chiefly British]

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Examples of patron in a Sentence

She is a well-known patron of the arts. the wealthy philanthropist is one of the city's most generous patrons of its symphony orchestra

Recent Examples on the Web

Impressed by the book, Leonardo da Vinci convinced his patron Lodovico Sforza to hire Pacioli to teach at the court of Milan. The Economist, "A revolutionary treatise goes on the block," 4 June 2019 Later in the evening, Echeverria announced that the restaurant had commissioned a painting of Rueda serving some of his famous patrons that would hang in a new private dining room planned next door. Carlos Valdez Lozano, latimes.com, "Remembering Ruben Rueda: Musso & Frank bartender threw out Steve McQueen and got a guitar from Keith Richards," 4 June 2019 North Korea, however, considers the U.S. a present security threat that requires it to arm itself with nuclear weapons and maintain a close partnership with China, its longtime patron. Niharika Mandhana, WSJ, "At Trump-Kim Summit, Host Vietnam Blazes Trail for North Korea," 23 Feb. 2019 The reason Lacey and others have been hinting that the National Theatre could be Meghan's avenue back into acting is simple: The Queen recently named Meghan the official royal patron of the theater. Kayleigh Roberts, Marie Claire, "Meghan Markle Will Make Her First Visit as Patron of the National Theatre This Week," 26 Jan. 2019 As the royal patron of the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families (AFNCCF), a crucial children’s mental health charity, Kate officially opened the organization's new Centre of Excellence. Amy Mackelden, Harper's BAZAAR, "Kate Middleton Looks Stunning in a Fitted Green Emilia Wickstead Dress at a Solo Engagement," 1 May 2019 But as of this month, the Peninsula hotel’s flagship location in Hong Kong is taking the concept of the hotel as patron of the arts to the next level. Lilah Ramzi, Vogue, "The Hotel as Patron of the Arts? In Hong Kong, the Peninsula Takes the Trend to the Next Level," 9 Apr. 2019 Meghan was also recently announced as patron of the Association of Commonwealth Universities, and last year, Prince Harry was appointed Commonwealth Youth Ambassador. Chloe Foussianes, Town & Country, "Kate Middleton Recycles a Red Catherine Walker Coatdress to Celebrate Commonwealth Day," 11 Mar. 2019 The company has hired hundreds of foreign workers through the visa program in recent years to cook, clean, and serve patrons at Trump clubs in Florida and New York, including the president’s Mar-a-Lago club in Palm Beach. Alexia Fernández Campbell, Vox, "The hypocrisy of Trump’s immigration agenda is getting harder to ignore," 11 Dec. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'patron.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of patron

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for patron

Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin & Latin; Medieval Latin patronus patron saint, patron of a benefice, pattern, from Latin, defender, from patr-, pater

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Statistics for patron

Last Updated

9 Jun 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for patron

The first known use of patron was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for patron

patron

noun

English Language Learners Definition of patron

: a person who gives money and support to an artist, organization, etc.
somewhat formal : a person who buys the goods or uses the services of a business, library, etc.

patron

noun
pa·​tron | \ ˈpā-trən How to pronounce patron (audio) \

Kids Definition of patron

1 : a person who gives generous support or approval
2 : customer

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More from Merriam-Webster on patron

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with patron

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for patron

Spanish Central: Translation of patron

Nglish: Translation of patron for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of patron for Arabic Speakers

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