parry

verb
par·​ry | \ ˈper-ē How to pronounce parry (audio) , ˈpa-rē\
parried; parrying

Definition of parry

intransitive verb

1 : to ward off a weapon or blow parried forcefully and knocked his opponent's sword out of his hand
2 : to evade or turn aside something can parry and thrust … without losing the thread of his argument— Stewart Cockburn

transitive verb

1 : to ward off (something, such as a blow) parried the thrust of his opponent's sword
2 : to evade especially by an adroit answer parried the question

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Other Words from parry

parry noun

What do parry, parapet, and parasol have in common?

Parry (which is used in fencing, among other applications) probably comes from parez, a form of the French verb parer, meaning "to guard or ward off." Its history can be compared with that of two other English words: parapet and parasol. Those two terms go back to an Italian word (parare) that means "to shield or guard." (A parapet shields soldiers and a parasol wards off the sun.) All three—parry, parapet, and parasol—can ultimately be traced to the Latin parare, meaning "to prepare." And they're not alone. Other descendants of the Latin term include apparatus, disparate, emperor, and even prepare.

Examples of parry in a Sentence

He parried the thrust of his opponent's sword. He parried and then threw a punch. She cleverly parried the reporters' questions.
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Recent Examples on the Web

But most of that is for parrying intrusions from China and North Korea, rather than actively stealing secrets. The Economist, "Japanese spies, once renowned, have fallen on hard times," 14 Sep. 2019 Joe Biden parried attack after attack from liberal rivals Thursday night on everything from health care to immigration in a debate that showcased profound ideological divides between the Democratic Party's moderate and progressive wings. Bill Barrow And Steve Peoples, chicagotribune.com, "The Democratic debate featured some fiery exchanges and put the divide between liberal and moderate candidates on display," 12 Sep. 2019 Bernd Leno, the Arsenal goalkeeper, parried Erik Lamela’s shot straight at Christian Eriksen’s feet, and suddenly Arsenal was two steps back. Rory Smith, New York Times, "At Arsenal, Rewriting the Story May Take a Bit More Time," 1 Sep. 2019 Biden took on the most fire, but parried it and, as front-runner, benefits the most from a no-decision. San Diego Union-Tribune, "Key takeaways from the Democratic candidates’ debate," 13 Sep. 2019 Alexandra Popp's close-range header was only parried by goalkeeper Sandra Panos, allowing Daebritz to beat Marta Torrejon to the ball and poke home what proved to be the winning goal. James Masters, CNN, "France beats Norway at Women's World Cup after VAR controversy," 12 June 2019 The Loons’ best first-half chance came in the 33rd minute as Dotson’s shot from distance was parried by Tim Melia, and then Toye’s rebound was palmed away by Melia. Andy Greder, Twin Cities, "Minnesota United gives up late goal and falls 1-0 to Sporting Kansas City," 22 Aug. 2019 At times, when Google seemed to be reacting to the small army of progressive activists who were garnering enormous news attention over the past three years, the company was actually parrying Cernekee. Wired, "How President Trump Scooped Me on a Google Story," 14 Aug. 2019 For more than two hours, Biden parried the unrelenting attacks. Dana Milbank, The Mercury News, "Milbank: Biden was gloriously adequate in second Democratic debate," 1 Aug. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'parry.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of parry

1671, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for parry

borrowed from French parer "to ward off, avert" (perhaps directly from the plural imperative parez), going back to Middle French, probably borrowed from Italian parare "to prepare, adorn, avert, shield, keep out," going back to Latin parāre "to supply, provide, make ready" — more at pare

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Statistics for parry

Last Updated

12 Oct 2019

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Time Traveler for parry

The first known use of parry was in 1671

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More Definitions for parry

parry

verb

English Language Learners Definition of parry

: to defend yourself by turning or pushing aside (a punch, a weapon, etc.)
: to avoid giving a direct answer to (a question) by being skillful or clever

parry

verb
par·​ry | \ ˈper-ē How to pronounce parry (audio) \
parried; parrying

Kids Definition of parry

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to turn aside an opponent's weapon or blow
2 : to avoid by a skillful answer She parried an embarrassing question.

parry

noun
plural parries

Kids Definition of parry (Entry 2 of 2)

: an act or instance of skillfully avoiding something

More from Merriam-Webster on parry

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with parry

Spanish Central: Translation of parry

Nglish: Translation of parry for Spanish Speakers

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