parry

verb
par·ry | \ˈper-ē, ˈpa-rē\
parried; parrying

Definition of parry 

intransitive verb

1 : to ward off a weapon or blow parried forcefully and knocked his opponent's sword out of his hand

2 : to evade or turn aside something can parry and thrust … without losing the thread of his argument— Stewart Cockburn

transitive verb

1 : to ward off (something, such as a blow) parried the thrust of his opponent's sword

2 : to evade especially by an adroit answer parried the question

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Other Words from parry

parry noun

What do parry, parapet, and parasol have in common?

Parry (which is used in fencing, among other applications) probably comes from parez, a form of the French verb parer, meaning "to guard or ward off." Its history can be compared with that of two other English words: parapet and parasol. Those two terms go back to an Italian word (parare) that means "to shield or guard." (A parapet shields soldiers and a parasol wards off the sun.) All three—parry, parapet, and parasol—can ultimately be traced to the Latin parare, meaning "to prepare." And they're not alone. Other descendants of the Latin term include apparatus, disparate, emperor, and even prepare.

Examples of parry in a Sentence

He parried the thrust of his opponent's sword. He parried and then threw a punch. She cleverly parried the reporters' questions.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Ajax winger Hakim Ziyech was twice denied by saves from Ukraine goalkeeper Andriy Pyatov, who pushed away a powerful rising shot in the 83rd minute and parried a first-half effort against the post. Graham Dunbar, chicagotribune.com, "Morocco held by Ukraine in World Cup prep friendly," 31 May 2018 In the 49th minute, Luis Suarez attempted a long freekick but was parried away by Mohammed Al-Owais. Luis Miguel Echegaray, SI.com, "WATCH: Suarez Scores as Uruguay beats Saudi Arabia, Clinches Last-16 Place," 20 June 2018 Ronaldo's header from Isco's cross was parried by Karius, and Benzema turned in the loose ball, but the Frenchman had come from a fraction ahead of the last defender and the flag came up. Afp, chicagotribune.com, "Real Madrid defeat Liverpool to win third straight Champions League," 26 May 2018 That was as close as Belgium came to taking the game to extra-time, though, as Lloris parried a long-range piledriver from Axel Witsel. Kieran Canning, chicagotribune.com, "Umtiti heads France into World Cup final as Belgium fall short," 10 July 2018 Marcus Epps beat two defenders off the dribble, then hit a low cross that LAFC goalkeeper Tyler Miller could only parry. Jonathan Tannenwald, Philly.com, "Adama Diomande hat trick sinks Union in 4-1 loss at LAFC," 30 June 2018 The chancellor could not maintain her poker face during a number of Trump’s comments at their news conference, her expression at times rotating between looks of amusement and bewilderment as the president parried with the press corps. Jonathan Lemire, BostonGlobe.com, "Trump, Merkel cordial, but no apparent movement on Iran," 27 Apr. 2018 From talk radio to Fox News to Breitbart, alternative public spheres coalesced as echo chambers, where climate science could be regularly parried and parodied and conservative precepts about government overreach perpetually reinforced. Christopher Sellers, Vox, "How Republicans came to embrace anti-environmentalism," 6 July 2018 The Paris Saint-Germain forward put a rebound into the left corner of the net after Diego Godin’s header was parried by Akinfeev. BostonGlobe.com, "Uruguay records third straight shutout with defeat of Russia," 25 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'parry.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of parry

1671, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for parry

borrowed from French parer "to ward off, avert" (perhaps directly from the plural imperative parez), going back to Middle French, probably borrowed from Italian parare "to prepare, adorn, avert, shield, keep out," going back to Latin parāre "to supply, provide, make ready" — more at pare

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Statistics for parry

Last Updated

28 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for parry

The first known use of parry was in 1671

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More Definitions for parry

parry

verb

English Language Learners Definition of parry

: to defend yourself by turning or pushing aside (a punch, a weapon, etc.)

: to avoid giving a direct answer to (a question) by being skillful or clever

parry

verb
par·ry | \ˈper-ē \
parried; parrying

Kids Definition of parry

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to turn aside an opponent's weapon or blow

2 : to avoid by a skillful answer She parried an embarrassing question.

parry

noun
plural parries

Kids Definition of parry (Entry 2 of 2)

: an act or instance of skillfully avoiding something

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More from Merriam-Webster on parry

See words that rhyme with parry

Spanish Central: Translation of parry

Nglish: Translation of parry for Spanish Speakers

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