paradigm

noun
par·​a·​digm | \ˈper-ə-ˌdīm, ˈpa-rə- also -ˌdim\

Definition of paradigm 

1 : example, pattern especially : an outstandingly clear or typical example or archetype … regard science as the paradigm of true knowledge. — G. C. J. Midgley

2 : an example of a conjugation or declension showing a word in all its inflectional forms

3 : a philosophical and theoretical framework of a scientific school or discipline within which theories, laws, and generalizations and the experiments performed in support of them are formulated the Freudian paradigm of psychoanalysis broadly : a philosophical or theoretical framework of any kind

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Other Words from paradigm

paradigmatic \ˌper-​ə-​dig-​ˈma-​tik, ˌpa-​rə-​ \ adjective
paradigmatically \ˌper-​ə-​dig-​ˈma-​ti-​k(ə-​)lē, ˌpa-​rə-​ \ adverb

Examples of paradigm in a Sentence

And the paradigm of a thing to be philosophical about is death. — Jim Holt, New York Times Book Review, 15 Feb. 2009 Such problems drive home a critical flaw in the paradigm of energy independence—namely, that energy isn't a zero-sum game anymore. — Paul Roberts, Mother Jones, May/June 2008 That the biomedical paradigm of single cause and single disease was a chimera was well understood by even its most vigorous advocates. — Allan M. Brandt, The Cigarette Century, 2007 Her recent book provides us with a new paradigm for modern biography. the Freudian paradigm of psychoanalysis a new study that challenges the current evolutionary paradigm
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Recent Examples on the Web

On the paradigm shifts that need to happen to protect survivors. Glamour, "The Women Who Took Down Larry Nassar on Life After the Ruling," 11 Nov. 2018 In this paradigm, agents are dumped into virtual world, and rewarded for some outcomes (like increasing their score) and penalized for others (like losing a life). James Vincent, The Verge, "How teaching AI to be curious helps machines learn for themselves," 1 Nov. 2018 Theranos wasn’t promising a better juicer, or a shift in the human resources paradigm. Brian Barrett, WIRED, "The Theranos Indictments Expose the Soul of Silicon Valley," 15 June 2018 While satiating our collective appetite for brushed-up brow texture, J.W.Anderson's harmonized hues offered a subtle but noteworthy shift in the contemporary above-eye paradigm. Calin Van Paris, Vogue, "The All-American Power Brow Is Back on the London Runway," 17 Feb. 2018 This makes especially dangerous the free-market logic of school choice, which operates in a paradigm of winners and losers rather than treating quality education as a universal public good with investments that intend to help all children. Clint Smith, The Atlantic, "The New Tax Law’s Subtle Subversion of Public Schools," 7 Feb. 2018 Because in choosing Uniqlo, Mr. Federer is effectively creating a new paradigm for a post-technical sports brand adventure. New York Times, "Roger Federer Wants to Win a New Game," 12 July 2018 Kuhn viewed this as fundamentally a language problem; old terms took on new meanings under the new paradigm. John Timmer, Ars Technica, "Gravitational waves and the slow pace of scientific revolutions," 30 June 2018 There’s an argument to be made that subjecting straight men to the same objectification everyone else has long lived with is not only fair play but in fact social progress, representing a new paradigm where no one identity group is overly centered. Spencer Kornhaber, The Atlantic, "What 'The Age of the Twink' Actually Means," 15 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'paradigm.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of paradigm

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for paradigm

Late Latin paradigma, from Greek paradeigma, from paradeiknynai to show side by side, from para- + deiknynai to show — more at diction

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Statistics for paradigm

Last Updated

27 Nov 2018

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Time Traveler for paradigm

The first known use of paradigm was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for paradigm

paradigm

noun

English Language Learners Definition of paradigm

: a model or pattern for something that may be copied

: a theory or a group of ideas about how something should be done, made, or thought about

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More from Merriam-Webster on paradigm

Spanish Central: Translation of paradigm

Nglish: Translation of paradigm for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of paradigm for Arabic Speakers

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