pantomime

noun
pan·​to·​mime | \ ˈpan-tə-ˌmīm How to pronounce pantomime (audio) \

Definition of pantomime

 (Entry 1 of 2)

2a : an ancient Roman dramatic performance featuring a solo dancer and a narrative chorus
b : any of various dramatic or dancing performances in which a story is told by expressive bodily or facial movements of the performers a ballet that is part dance and part pantomime
c : a British theatrical entertainment of the Christmas season based on a nursery tale and featuring topical songs, tableaux, and dances
3a : conveyance of a story by bodily or facial movements especially in drama or dance
b : the art or genre of conveying a story by bodily movements only

pantomime

verb
pantomimed; pantomiming

Definition of pantomime (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to engage in pantomime

transitive verb

: to represent by pantomime

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Other Words from pantomime

Noun

pantomimic \ ˌpan-​tə-​ˈmi-​mik How to pronounce pantomimic (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms for pantomime

Synonyms: Noun

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Examples of pantomime in a Sentence

Noun In the game of charades, one player uses pantomime to represent a word or phrase that the other players have to try to guess. We saw pantomimes at the fair. a ballet that is part dance and part pantomime Verb He pantomimed someone talking on the phone.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Though Marston borrows a lot from modern dance — fluidity of the torso, copious floor work and a pinch of tanztheater, for example — these motifs harken more to ballet’s conventional use of pantomime than modern dance’s affinity for gesture. Lauren Warnecke, chicagotribune.com, "Review: Joffrey’s cast is terrific in ‘Jane Eyre,’ but bring your crib sheet," 17 Oct. 2019 And needless to say, that song and the lyrics give you every opportunity to explore that explicitly under the guise of this big pantomime. Chancellor Agard, EW.com, "The Morning Show star Billy Crudup on the 'whirlwind' of singing with Jennifer Aniston," 15 Nov. 2019 The musicians sounded as tonally warm and technically nimble as always, thanks to their own achievements, not Rachlin’s pantomime. Howard Reich, chicagotribune.com, "Chicago Symphony Orchestra review: The genius of Argentine tango master Astor Piazzolla," 19 Oct. 2019 The motion of the Beovision Harmony is inspired by the pantomime theater at Tivoli Gardens, a famous amusement park in Copenhagen. Ingrid Abramovitch, ELLE Decor, "Here’s Why Your Next TV Will Cost More Than $20,000—and Have Wings!," 22 Sep. 2019 Meanwhile, all of the aforementioned is ignored as the UK distracts itself with a pantomime, as though facts are meaningless. Luke Mcgee, CNN, "The UK might be living through its own post-truth Trump moment," 29 June 2019 For those England fans who had welcomed Smith as a pantomime villain with a chorus of boos, this was a chastening experience as the figure of fun became the star of the show. James Masters, CNN, "The Ashes: Steve Smith 'probably the best Test batsman we've ever seen' as Australia crushes England in opener," 5 Aug. 2019 Mr van Beurden’s plain speaking will earn him little credit from those determined to paint the firm as a pantomime villain. The Economist, "Shell’s boss delivers some hard truths on oil and climate change," 4 July 2019 The watch-tap pantomime was meme-ready, but Swift’s words will hopefully result in real change. Jason Lipshutz, Billboard, "The 16 Best Moments from the 2019 MTV Video Music Awards," 27 Aug. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb In the stands, filmmaker and Yankees fan Spike Lee pantomimed a call to the bullpen. Stephanie Apstein, SI.com, "The Yankees' Bullpen Is Championship Quality, but Can Aaron Boone Run It Properly?," 2 Oct. 2019 When notorious White Hart Lane pantomime villain (no pun intended here) Tim Sherwood took the Aston Villa job, Spurs fans circled April 11 2015 in their calendars for his return to N17. SI.com, "Tottenham's 7 Most Embarrassing Defeats Under Mauricio Pochettino," 25 Sep. 2019 There’s plenty of opportunity for pantomiming, and its stop-and-start quiz show energy encourages audience participation. Andrew R. Chow, Time, "The Best Karaoke Songs For Singers and Non-Singers Alike," 26 Sep. 2019 As Randy pantomimed a whipping, Darryl gave a shriek that must have startled all of Stamford. Tom Verducci, SI.com, "The Hard, Historic Roads That Lead to Baseball's Magic Number: .400," 8 Aug. 2019 Amid smoke and clouds of dust, spectators ran the bases and pantomimed baseball players pitching, batting and sliding. Joe Lapointe, Detroit Free Press, "40 years ago, Disco Demolition Night stirred culture war still being fought," 12 July 2019 The practice crosses cultures; in the Dominican Republic, people pantomime the air güira, a metal percussion instrument. April White, Smithsonian, "An Electrifying History of Air Guitar," 11 July 2019 Morgan pantomimed sipping a cup of tea - a reference to Queen Elizabeth or to the Boston Tea Party? - after her goal. Ann Killion, SFChronicle.com, "One more game for U.S. women, who will play for World Cup title," 2 July 2019 Jim Delaney, senior operations manager at the recycling center, pantomimed a gesture that reminded me of an umpire calling a batter out on strikes, complete with leg kick. Dave Mcintyre, Washington Post, "Does your county recycle wine bottles? The answer may surprise you," 14 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'pantomime.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of pantomime

Noun

1606, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1768, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for pantomime

Noun and Verb

Latin pantomimus, from pant- + mimus mime

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Time Traveler for pantomime

Time Traveler

The first known use of pantomime was in 1606

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Statistics for pantomime

Last Updated

12 Dec 2019

Cite this Entry

“Pantomime.” The Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Inc., https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pantomime. Accessed 19 January 2020.

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More Definitions for pantomime

pantomime

noun
How to pronounce pantomime (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of pantomime

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a way of expressing information or telling a story without words by using body movements and facial expressions
: a performance in which a story is told without words by using body movements and facial expressions
British : a play for children performed during the Christmas season that is based on a fairy tale and includes singing and dancing

pantomime

verb

English Language Learners Definition of pantomime (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make the movements of someone who is doing something without actually doing it

pantomime

noun
pan·​to·​mime | \ ˈpan-tə-ˌmīm How to pronounce pantomime (audio) \

Kids Definition of pantomime

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the act of showing or explaining something through movements of the body and face instead of by talking
2 : a show in which a story is told by using expressions on the face and movements of the body instead of words

pantomime

verb
pantomimed; pantomiming

Kids Definition of pantomime (Entry 2 of 2)

: to tell through movements rather than words

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