pantomime

noun
pan·to·mime | \ ˈpan-tə-ˌmīm \

Definition of pantomime 

(Entry 1 of 2)

2a : an ancient Roman dramatic performance featuring a solo dancer and a narrative chorus

b : any of various dramatic or dancing performances in which a story is told by expressive bodily or facial movements of the performers a ballet that is part dance and part pantomime

c : a British theatrical entertainment of the Christmas season based on a nursery tale and featuring topical songs, tableaux, and dances

3a : conveyance of a story by bodily or facial movements especially in drama or dance

b : the art or genre of conveying a story by bodily movements only

pantomime

verb
pantomimed; pantomiming

Definition of pantomime (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to engage in pantomime

transitive verb

: to represent by pantomime

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Other words from pantomime

Noun

pantomimic \ˌpan-tə-ˈmi-mik \ adjective

Synonyms for pantomime

Synonyms: Noun

gesticulation, gesture, mime, sign, signal

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Examples of pantomime in a Sentence

Noun

In the game of charades, one player uses pantomime to represent a word or phrase that the other players have to try to guess. We saw pantomimes at the fair. a ballet that is part dance and part pantomime

Verb

He pantomimed someone talking on the phone.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

However, since then, the pantomime villain's antics have made his save against Ghana look almost insignificant, and that's saying something. SI.com, "World Cup Countdown: 9 Days to Go - How Luis Suarez Became Football’s Ultimate Pantomime Villain," 5 June 2018 The Colombian midfielder was the pantomime villain in England's round of 16 match, and was lucky not to be sent off after headbutting Liverpool midfielder Jordan Henderson in the chest. SI.com, "Spurs Fans Applaud Potential Signing Wilmar Barrios Following Jordan Henderson Headbutt," 4 July 2018 The pantomime tends to fall into two orders: in one, the relationship was discreetly consummated; in the other, the pathos of yearning and missing feels overwhelming. Junot Díaz, The New Yorker, "The Sense Beneath Edward Lear’s Nonsense," 17 Apr. 2018 Though Britain prides itself on projecting pageantry and high theater in its politics, Brexit’s 774 days have better resembled local pantomime: a weak cast, bad jokes, and little to entertain out-of-towners. Sean Williams, The New Republic, "England’s World Cup Team: the Anti-Brexit," 10 July 2018 Congressional Republicans will perform some pantomimes of fiscal concern in the days ahead. Tory Newmyer, Washington Post, "The Finance 202: Republicans are the drivers of skyrocketing deficit," 10 Apr. 2018 Instead, whenever a hereditary peer hangs up his ermine, a pantomime of democracy follows. The Economist, "Peers fight for a place in the House of Lords," 21 June 2018 Jimbo the Musical Clown Accordion music from around the world, circus skills, hat tricks, juggling, dance, pantomime and skits with audience participation. Chronicle Staff Report, San Francisco Chronicle, "Kids listings," 14 June 2018 The point of her pantomime seemed to be that even getting bombed was better than being hidden under a burka. Rafia Zakaria, The New Republic, "The Feminist Future of Modesty," 12 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

First, Wong clutches her face, knocking her red nerd glasses askew and pantomiming the feeling of a great gust of wind drying out her eyeballs. Vogue, "Ali Wong: Hard Knock Wife," 11 May 2018 Thompson heard the team will be assigned an interpretor, but she's prepared to pantomime her way through the trip. Beth Bragg, Anchorage Daily News, "The Seawolves had to make a lot of pot pies to pay their way to a basketball tournament in Taiwan," 28 June 2018 Crossing hands in front of himself to indicate handcuffs, Ahmed, 24, a spiky-haired Somali, pantomimed how German authorities sent him back — not once, but twice — to Italy. Frances D'emilio, Fox News, "Italy vows to expel far more migrants, but it won't be easy," 22 June 2018 For every new round with Paula, Plaza burns a hole into the deck with her intent gaze, only occasionally breaking her concentration to pantomime in my direction. Nojan Aminosharei, Marie Claire, "Aubrey Plaza Was Never April Ludgate," 13 June 2018 But cracks showed as the 81-year-old Berlusconi pantomimed as Salvini read political priorities from a statement, clearly not pleased to be on the sidelines. Washington Post, "Berlusconi at center of impasse on forming Italy’s new govt," 13 Apr. 2018 Ever the prankster, Jonathan could be seen pantomiming along with Calhoun’s non-verbal communications. Chris Brodeur, courant.com, "On Jim Calhoun's 76th Birthday, 7 Joyful Moments And 6 That Weren't So Joyful," 10 May 2018 Trying to help, Young walked over to LeBron and pantomimed the exact motion LeBron had made to get the call. Gregg Doyel, Indianapolis Star, "Doyel: Pacers bloody LeBron, blow out Cavs, set up Game 7," 27 Apr. 2018 The cast are conceived as clowns, improvising scenery and costumes, and using stock theatrical devices, pantomime vaudeville and varied musical styles to interpret one of humanity's greatest events. Maria Shine Stewart, cleveland.com, "Float over some drab days with song and hope: Sun Messages," 8 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'pantomime.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of pantomime

Noun

1606, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1768, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for pantomime

Noun

Latin pantomimus, from pant- + mimus mime

Verb

see pantomime entry 1

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Statistics for pantomime

Last Updated

5 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for pantomime

The first known use of pantomime was in 1606

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More Definitions for pantomime

pantomime

noun

English Language Learners Definition of pantomime

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a way of expressing information or telling a story without words by using body movements and facial expressions

: a performance in which a story is told without words by using body movements and facial expressions

: a play for children performed during the Christmas season that is based on a fairy tale and includes singing and dancing

pantomime

verb

English Language Learners Definition of pantomime (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make the movements of someone who is doing something without actually doing it

pantomime

noun
pan·to·mime | \ ˈpan-tə-ˌmīm \

Kids Definition of pantomime

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the act of showing or explaining something through movements of the body and face instead of by talking

2 : a show in which a story is told by using expressions on the face and movements of the body instead of words

pantomime

verb
pantomimed; pantomiming

Kids Definition of pantomime (Entry 2 of 2)

: to tell through movements rather than words

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