late

adjective
\ ˈlāt How to pronounce late (audio) \
later; latest

Definition of late

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a(1) : coming or remaining after the due, usual, or proper time a late spring was late for class
(2) : of, relating to, or imposed because of tardiness had to pay a late fee
b(1) : of or relating to an advanced stage in point of time or development : occurring near the end of a period of time or series the late Middle Ages
(2) : far advanced toward the close of the day or night late hours
2a : living comparatively recently : now deceased used of persons the late John Doe and often with reference to a specific relationship or status his late wife
b : being something or holding some position or relationship recently but not now the late belligerents
c : made, appearing, or happening just previous to the present time especially as the most recent of a succession our late quarrel

late

adverb
later; latest

Definition of late (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : after the usual or proper time got to work late
b : at or to an advanced point of time
2 : not long ago : recently a writer late of Chicago
of late
: in the period shortly or immediately preceding : recently has been sick of late

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Other Words from late

Adjective

lateness noun

Choose the Right Synonym for late

Adjective

dead, defunct, deceased, departed, late mean devoid of life. dead applies literally to what is deprived of vital force but is used figuratively of anything that has lost any attribute (such as energy, activity, radiance) suggesting life. a dead, listless performance defunct stresses cessation of active existence or operation. a defunct television series deceased, departed, and late apply to persons who have died recently. deceased is the preferred term in legal use. the estate of the deceased departed is used usually as a euphemism. our departed sister late is used especially with reference to a person in a specific relation or status. the company's late president

Examples of late in a Sentence

Adjective It happened in late spring. a word first recorded in the late 17th century We had a late spring this year. Hurry up or we'll be late for school. Their warning was too late to help him. I've always been a late riser. He made a donation to the school in memory of his late wife. Adverb Late in the year he became ill. It rained late in the day. Late in his career he moved to the city. a word first recorded late in the 17th century They were trailing by a touchdown late in the fourth quarter. The package should be arriving late next week. He sent in his job application late. They arrived too late for breakfast. I like getting up late. The package arrived late, but better late than never!
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Georgetown University on Friday announced that a former undergraduate had accused late priest and Provost J. Donald Freeze of nonconsensual contact. NBC News, 12 June 2021 Parratto was a late replacement to pair with Schnell, an individual bronze medalist at 2019 worlds. David Woods, The Indianapolis Star, 12 June 2021 Prominent leaders of the civil rights movement like Medgar Evers, Maya Angelou, and the late Congressman John Lewis were products of these institutions. Erica Davies, CBS News, 12 June 2021 His mind drifted to a quiet hospital room in Houston as his father, Jim, battled the late, awful throes of Alzheimer’s disease. San Diego Union-Tribune, 12 June 2021 After the match, Krejcikova paid tribute to her late coach Jana Novotna, the Czech tennis greawho died in 2017. Lorenzo Reyes, USA TODAY, 12 June 2021 Manager Alex Cora said during spring training that Hernández would almost certainly play second base in the late innings of any game the Sox had a chance to win. BostonGlobe.com, 12 June 2021 The Shakespearean-camp costumes, designed by the late AJ Garcia and Ashley Kitzman-Ortiz, help too. Matthew J. Palm, orlandosentinel.com, 12 June 2021 Deadline to register is June 29, or until full (a $10 late fee will be assessed after the deadline). cleveland, 12 June 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Adverb The National Weather Service warned of the potential for record-breaking heat, beginning Monday and stretching late into next week. Hayley Smith, Los Angeles Times, 11 June 2021 In the boys win, Fallston (10-1) overcame an early challenge from the outnumbered Warriors (4-8), who led 3-1 late into the first quarter. Randy Mcroberts, baltimoresun.com, 11 June 2021 To this end, Toole has been focusing on eating more simply, prioritizing recovery and relaxation like reading, and putting limits on doing work and meetings late into the evening. Jessica Gold, Forbes, 11 June 2021 Politico also reported his schedule in his official capacity as Borough President has remained light as he's used the building late into the evening. Ryan W. Miller, USA TODAY, 10 June 2021 The hearing Monday lasted 12 hours, and late into the night, as Navalny's team suggested the authorities were trying to rush through the ruling. Patrick Reevell, ABC News, 9 June 2021 The Group of 7 delegations, which represent Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and the United States, negotiated late into Friday to hash out details of how the new tax systems would work and the language in the statement. Alan Rappeport, New York Times, 5 June 2021 The Group of 7 delegations, which represent Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and the United States, negotiated late into Friday to hash out details of how the new tax systems would work and the language in the statement. BostonGlobe.com, 5 June 2021 Hundreds of cars would cruise the streets late into the night, their engines adding to the din of loud music, fireworks and sirens. Rebecca Lurye, courant.com, 4 June 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'late.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of late

Adjective

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a(1)

Adverb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for late

Adjective and Adverb

Middle English, late, slow, from Old English læt; akin to Old High German laz slow, Old English lǣtan to let

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Time Traveler for late

Time Traveler

The first known use of late was before the 12th century

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Statistics for late

Last Updated

15 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Late.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/late. Accessed 24 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for late

late

adverb

English Language Learners Definition of late

: at or near the end of a period of time or a process, activity, series, etc.
: after the usual or expected time

late

adjective
\ ˈlāt How to pronounce late (audio) \
later; latest

Kids Definition of late

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : coming or occurring after the usual or proper time a late spring
2 : coming or occurring toward the end He married in his late twenties.
3 : having died or recently left a certain position the late president
4 : recent sense 2 a late discovery

Other Words from late

lateness noun Do you realize the lateness of the hour?

late

adverb
later; latest

Kids Definition of late (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : after the usual or proper time We arrived late.
2 : near the end of something We'll see you late next week.
of late
: lately I have not seen him of late.

More from Merriam-Webster on late

Nglish: Translation of late for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of late for Arabic Speakers

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