niece

noun
\ ˈnēs How to pronounce niece (audio) \

Definition of niece

1 : a daughter of one's brother, sister, brother-in-law, or sister-in-law
2 : an illegitimate (see illegitimate sense 1) daughter of an ecclesiastic

Examples of niece in a Sentence

If he's my uncle, then I'm his niece.
Recent Examples on the Web Bill’s is Thea (Samara Weaving, niece of Hugo Weaving). Kyle Smith, National Review, "Bill & Ted Party On (and On)," 28 Aug. 2020 In the days after August 4, that niece of mine, now a teenager in Lebanon, was packing care parcels for a local charity to distribute in Beirut. Rania Abouzeid, National Geographic, "Why must every Lebanese generation endure violent chaos—and its aftermath?," 26 Aug. 2020 Angelina Weld Grimké was the grand-niece of white suffragist Angelina Grimké Weld. Alex Scimecca, Fortune, "The Black suffragists you should know on the 19th amendment’s 100th anniversary," 18 Aug. 2020 Just weeks before his death, Robert Trump had tried to block the publication of a book by Mary Trump, a niece of both Robert Trump and the president whose father was their late brother Fred Trump Jr., who died in 1981. Fox News, "Ted Cruz, others rip Washington Post over ‘sick’ Robert Trump obit headline," 16 Aug. 2020 Meena Harris, niece of Kamala Harris and a lawyer in Oakland, shared how special the moment was for her family. Kellie Hwang, SFChronicle.com, "‘This is HISTORIC’: How the Bay Area is responding to Kamala Harris as Biden’s VP pick," 11 Aug. 2020 The Berrys' lawsuit says Tanya Amyx Berry is a maternal niece of O'Hanlon and her oldest living heir. Rebecca Reynolds Yonker, USA TODAY, "Author Wendell Berry sues to block removal of disputed Kentucky mural; Black artist also wants it to stay," 7 July 2020 The lawsuit says Tanya Amyx Berry is a maternal niece of O’Hanlon and her oldest living heir. Washington Post, "Author sues to stop removal of controversial Kentucky mural," 6 July 2020 Simon & Schuster could go ahead with its plans to release a tell-all book by Mary L. Trump, the niece of President Trump, reversing a lower court’s decision from this week that had temporarily halted publication. Alan Feuer, BostonGlobe.com, "Tell-all book on Trump can move forward pending hearing, judge rules," 2 July 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'niece.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of niece

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for niece

Middle English nece granddaughter, niece, from Anglo-French nece, niece, from Late Latin neptia, from Latin neptis; akin to Latin nepot-, nepos grandson, nephew — more at nephew

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Time Traveler for niece

Time Traveler

The first known use of niece was in the 14th century

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Statistics for niece

Last Updated

22 Sep 2020

Cite this Entry

“Niece.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/niece. Accessed 24 Sep. 2020.

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More Definitions for niece

niece

noun
How to pronounce niece (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of niece

: a daughter of your brother or sister

niece

noun
\ ˈnēs How to pronounce niece (audio) \

Kids Definition of niece

: a daughter of a person's brother or sister

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Comments on niece

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