neocon

noun
neo·​con | \ ˈnē-ō-ˌkän How to pronounce neocon (audio) \

Definition of neocon

Examples of neocon in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Kirkpatrick and her neocon confreres overcame their embarrassment at their down-market coalition partners and made the leap to Reagan nonetheless; Kirkpatrick ended up his United Nations ambassador. Rick Perlstein, The New Republic, "The Secret History of Ronald Reagan’s Letters," 14 Aug. 2020 He was pulled into the neocon movement in the U.S. while earning his Ph.D. at the University of Chicago in 1979, and has since held senior positions in the administrations of Ronald Reagan, George H. W. Bush, and George W. Bush. Time, "Secret Annexes, Backroom Deals: Can Zalmay Khalilzad Deliver Afghan Peace for Trump?," 14 Feb. 2020 Bolton was a disgruntled former employee, a neocon, a money-grubber with a two-million-dollar book to sell. Susan B. Glasser, The New Yorker, "The Bolton Bombshell and the Unwaveringly Pro-Trump G.O.P.," 28 Jan. 2020 Is his American Sniper a hunk of jingoistic propaganda or a mythic deconstruction of the same, neocon pandering or one of the more enigmatic anti-war films to emerge from the War of Terror? Isaac Feldberg, Fortune, "What to Watch (and Skip) in Theaters and on Netflix This Weekend," 13 Dec. 2019 For too long, the debate has focused on the paleocon and neocon positions, ignoring the question of whether there remains a Republican center on foreign policy. Michael Auslin, National Review, "Colin Dueck Makes the Case for Conservative Nationalism," 5 Nov. 2019 But Fukuyama seems to have finally made a break from the profound cultural pessimism of the Straussian neocons. Win Mccormack, The New Republic, "Fukuyama’s Inner Civic Republicanism (Part 1)," 17 Oct. 2019 Krauthammer spent his political youth as a liberal-ish speechwriter for Walter Mondale and ended up a neocon on Fox News. David Remnick, The New Yorker, "Trump Clarification Syndrome," 23 Aug. 2019 Late in the play, Strand introduces a third character, Brad (Brett Mack), a neocon who mostly is there to try to destroy Cat in a way that her gentler boss would not countenance. Chris Jones, chicagotribune.com, "'The Originalist' at Court Theatre has a tricky job in portraying Antonin Scalia," 21 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'neocon.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of neocon

1979, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for neocon

by shortening

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Cite this Entry

“Neocon.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/neocon. Accessed 8 Mar. 2021.

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