nanny

noun
nan·​ny | \ ˈna-nē How to pronounce nanny (audio) \
variants: or less commonly nannie
plural nannies

Definition of nanny

: a child's nurse or caregiver

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Examples of nanny in a Sentence

When I was growing up, I had a nanny. wrote a memoir recounting her days as a nanny for the rich and often indiscreet

Recent Examples on the Web

In 2015, investigators put out surveillance footage from a nanny cam, asking the public for help in identifying the suspect. Madeline Holcombe And Joshua Girsky, CNN, "An 82-year-old man slipped past doormen in upscale buildings for years and stole $400K in jewelry, police say," 8 Sep. 2019 The responses ranged from nanny-cam-like to downright creative — but some raise issues about privacy. Laura Daily, Washington Post, "As homeowners find new uses for security cameras, checking law should be first step," 27 Aug. 2019 Out of college with few job prospects, Finn finds work as a nanny for 4-year-old Amabel, daughter of Philip Martin. Kerry Lengel, azcentral, "Why 'Girl in the Rearview Mirror' author set her debut thriller in Phoenix," 20 June 2019 Middleton balanced being a new mom and majority caucus chair by hiring a nanny who brought Zoe to the Capitol when Middleton had a free moment. Anna Staver, The Denver Post, "Bills and a baby: Colorado Sen. Brittany Pettersen is breaking new ground," 20 Aug. 2019 Julie and Russell Berman said their nanny of six years, Rebecca Katz, took Tigger without their consent. Janelle Griffith, NBC News, "New York nanny says she stole family's cat because they were going to euthanize it," 1 Aug. 2019 Sadly, her nanny Raquel wasn’t around to whip up some of her beloved cheese pasta, so Corinne made due with whatever producers set in front of her. Kristen Baldwin, EW.com, "A brief history of Bachelor and Bachelorette villains eating on camera," 2 July 2019 Sproat said her nanny and son returned to their home in the high-end McDowell Mountain Ranch area of Scottsdale about 12:15 p.m. and found the note taped to her door. Claire Rafford, azcentral, "Scottsdale woman speaks out after she found a racist photo on her front door," 21 June 2019 Much of young Gloria’s early childhood was spent in Paris with her longtime nanny. The Washington Post, Twin Cities, "Gloria Vanderbilt, 95; actress, socialite was subject of scandal-tinged 1930s custody trial," 17 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'nanny.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of nanny

1785, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for nanny

probably of baby-talk origin

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Statistics for nanny

Last Updated

8 Oct 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for nanny

The first known use of nanny was in 1785

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More Definitions for nanny

nanny

noun

English Language Learners Definition of nanny

: a woman who is paid to care for a young child usually in the child's home

nanny

noun
nan·​ny | \ ˈna-nē How to pronounce nanny (audio) \
plural nannies

Kids Definition of nanny

: a child's nurse

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More from Merriam-Webster on nanny

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with nanny

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for nanny

Spanish Central: Translation of nanny

Nglish: Translation of nanny for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of nanny for Arabic Speakers

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