myrtle

noun, often attributive
myr·tle | \ˈmər-tᵊl \

Definition of myrtle 

1a : a common evergreen bushy shrub (Myrtus communis of the family Myrtaceae, the myrtle family) of southern Europe with oval to lance-shaped shiny leaves, fragrant white or rosy flowers, and black berries

b : any of the chiefly tropical shrubs or trees comprising the myrtle family

Illustration of myrtle

Illustration of myrtle

myrtle 1a

Examples of myrtle in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web

Designed by florist Shane Connolly, the bouquet was almost entirely lily of the valley, and also included myrtle as well as sweet William, hyacinth and ivy. Tamara Abraham, Harper's BAZAAR, "Meghan Markle's Royal Wedding Bouquet Is Surprisingly Similar to Kate's," 19 May 2018 Prince Albert’s grandmother gave Victoria a nosegay containing myrtle. Diana Pearl, PEOPLE.com, "Prince Harry Picked Flowers for Meghan Markle's Bouquet — Plus, the Sweet Tribute to Princess Diana," 19 May 2018 Their most popular is the anti-insomnia Tranquili-tea made with chamomile and lemon myrtle. Steffi Victorioso, Los Angeles Magazine, "Local Women Are Hosting Fancy “High Teas” With the Help of a Cannabis Brand," 29 May 2018 The language of flowers is important and romantic, too; Ms. Markle’s bouquet had a sprig of myrtle in it — a sign of hope and love, often in British royal bridal bouquets. Marianne Rohrlich, New York Times, "How the Royal Wedding Might Influence Weddings to Come," 22 May 2018 The design was painstakingly detailed, and included everything from the floral archway to Duchess Meghan's sprig of myrtle to Prince Harry's (mildly controversial) scruffy beard. Zoë Weiner, Teen Vogue, "Makeup Artist Creates Meghan Markle and Prince Harry Royal Wedding Lip Art," 21 May 2018 And in royal tradition, Markle’s bouquet also includes myrtle sprigs, which represents love, according to the royal family’s Twitter account. Meagan Fredette, refinery29.com, "They Did It: Harry & Meghan Share First Royal Kiss," 19 May 2018 The tradition of a royal bride carrying myrtle in her wedding bouquet dates back to Queen Victoria's era. Maggie Maloney, Town & Country, "8 Surprising Things You Might Not Know About Kate Middleton's Wedding Dress," 15 May 2018 The tradition began at the 1840 wedding of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, and every British royal bride since has carried myrtle down the aisle from the same bouquet. Janine Puhak, Fox News, "5 strictest dress code rules for the royal wedding," 1 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'myrtle.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of myrtle

1562, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for myrtle

Middle English mirtille, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin myrtillus, from Latin myrtus, from Greek myrtos

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Time Traveler for myrtle

The first known use of myrtle was in 1562

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More Definitions for myrtle

myrtle

noun

English Language Learners Definition of myrtle

: a type of small tree that has sweet-smelling white or pink flowers and black berries

myrtle

noun
myr·tle | \ˈmər-tᵊl \

Kids Definition of myrtle

1 : an evergreen shrub of southern Europe with fragrant flowers

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