mucilage

noun
mu·​ci·​lage | \ ˈmyü-s(ə-)lij How to pronounce mucilage (audio) \

Definition of mucilage

1 : a gelatinous substance of various plants (such as legumes or seaweeds) that contains protein and polysaccharides and is similar to plant gums
2 : an aqueous usually viscid solution (as of a gum) used especially as an adhesive

Examples of mucilage in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web One day in July, the mucilage suddenly disappeared. Jenna Scatena, The Atlantic, 18 Dec. 2021 But in the early 2000s, marine mucilage started breaking out pretty much every year, which scientists, in a 2009 paper, linked to climate change. Sarah Zhang, The Atlantic, 21 June 2021 The mucilage is spreading to the Black Sea and the Aegean, said Mr. Kesici, the hydrobiologist. New York Times, 9 July 2021 The problem first came to light in November, when Mr. Sari was flooded with urgent calls from local fishermen about the mucilage. New York Times, 9 July 2021 Turkey has seen a growing layer of marine mucilage drying and decomposing on the Sea of Marmara's surface for the last several months. Theresa Machemer, Smithsonian Magazine, 22 June 2021 Reducing pollution would likely remove the root of the problem; mucilage outbreaks in the Adriatic Sea have become less common since Italy began treating its wastewater, per the Atlantic. Theresa Machemer, Smithsonian Magazine, 22 June 2021 But pollution alone doesn’t explain the appearance of so much sea snot—or marine mucilage, to use the scientific term. Sarah Zhang, The Atlantic, 21 June 2021 Cutting into okra releases the mucilage, a natural sugar-protein substance that thickens when heated. Casey Barber, CNN, 18 June 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'mucilage.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of mucilage

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for mucilage

Middle English muscilage, from Late Latin mucilago mucus, musty juice, from Latin mucus

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Time Traveler for mucilage

Time Traveler

The first known use of mucilage was in the 15th century

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Dictionary Entries Near mucilage

mucific

mucilage

mucilage cell

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Statistics for mucilage

Last Updated

16 Jan 2022

Cite this Entry

“Mucilage.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/mucilage. Accessed 19 Jan. 2022.

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More Definitions for mucilage

mucilage

noun
mu·​ci·​lage | \ ˈmyü-sə-lij How to pronounce mucilage (audio) \

Kids Definition of mucilage

: a water solution of a gum or similar substance used especially to stick things together

mucilage

noun
mu·​ci·​lage | \ ˈmyü-s(ə-)lij How to pronounce mucilage (audio) \

Medical Definition of mucilage

1 : a gelatinous substance of various plants (as legumes or seaweeds) that contains protein and polysaccharides and is similar to plant gums
2 : an aqueous usually viscid solution (as of a gum) used in pharmacy as an excipient and in medicine as a demulcent

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