mimicry

noun
mim·​ic·​ry | \ ˈmi-mi-krē How to pronounce mimicry (audio) \
plural mimicries

Definition of mimicry

1a : an instance of mimicking
b : the action, practice, or art of mimicking entertained his family with mimicry and comic skits— Cynthia Ozick
2 : a superficial (see superficial sense 2b) resemblance of one organism to another or to natural objects among which it lives that secures it a selective advantage (such as protection from predation)

Examples of mimicry in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web While Penrose drew on influences ranging from ancient warfare to camouflage in the natural world, his Surrealist passion for mimicry was apparent throughout the book. Town & Country, 23 Mar. 2022 Ball’s natural speaking voice was deeper and huskier from years of smoking, though Kidman was not necessarily striving for perfect mimicry. New York Times, 28 Dec. 2021 Not that the Trump mimicry has earned DeSantis the former president's favor. Nicole Hemmer, CNN, 20 Jan. 2022 In keeping with most of human history, the non-ruling class attempted to emulate the lifestyle and fashion of the elite, prompting the consequent passage of laws that prohibited such mimicry and set limits on length based on one’s social status. Ray Mcclanahan, Outside Online, 29 Apr. 2019 Other research groups have speculated that the virus might carry proteins that resemble myelin, a case of molecular mimicry that could trigger an autoimmune reaction. Megan Molteni, STAT, 14 Jan. 2022 This is particularly true in the case of John Magaro as Silvio Dante, whose over-the-top mimicry of Steven Van Zandt’s earlier performance borders on the absurd. Bill Goodykoontz, Detroit Free Press, 1 Oct. 2021 Here is a book that insists that the desire for fiction, for its mimicry and its mirage, is indistinguishable from the desire for another person. The New Yorker, 13 Dec. 2021 This is particularly true in the case of John Magaro as Silvio Dante, whose over-the-top mimicry of Steven Van Zandt’s earlier performance borders on the absurd. Bill Goodykoontz, Detroit Free Press, 1 Oct. 2021 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'mimicry.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of mimicry

1671, in the meaning defined at sense 1b

Learn More About mimicry

Time Traveler for mimicry

Time Traveler

The first known use of mimicry was in 1671

See more words from the same year

Dictionary Entries Near mimicry

mimic gene

mimicry

mimic thrush

See More Nearby Entries 

Statistics for mimicry

Last Updated

25 Apr 2022

Cite this Entry

“Mimicry.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/mimicry. Accessed 18 May. 2022.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

More Definitions for mimicry

mimicry

noun
mim·​ic·​ry | \ ˈmi-mi-krē How to pronounce mimicry (audio) \

Kids Definition of mimicry

: a type of protection from predators in which one animal resembles the coloring, form, or behavior of another animal that is harmful or bad-tasting

mimicry

noun
mim·​ic·​ry | \ ˈmim-i-krē How to pronounce mimicry (audio) \
plural mimicries

Medical Definition of mimicry

: an instance of mimicking something

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Eponyms: Words Named After People

How Strong Is Your Vocabulary?

Test your vocabulary with our 10-question quiz!

TAKE THE QUIZ
Universal Daily Crossword

A daily challenge for crossword fanatics.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!