midterm

noun
mid·​term | \ ˈmid-ˌtərm (usual for sense 1b) How to pronounce midterm (audio) , -ˈtərm \

Definition of midterm

1a : the middle of an academic term
b : an examination at midterm
2 : the approximate middle of a term of office

Examples of midterm in a Sentence

The students will be busy taking midterms next week. He dropped the course before midterm. assessing the President's performance at midterm
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Recent Examples on the Web Stivers was chair of the National Republican Congressional Committee in 2018, a challenging midterm election year when Republicans lost the House majority. Kevin Freking, Star Tribune, "GOP Rep. Steve Stivers resigns to run Ohio commerce chamber," 19 Apr. 2021 One of the first candidates to fill the midterm vacancy was Amelia Powers Gardner, the county clerk/auditor. Leia Larsen, The Salt Lake Tribune, "Utah County Commission moves toward repeal of 2019 tax hike," 25 Mar. 2021 Building Back Together has said it would be geared toward policy instead of elections, avoiding organizational conflicts within the Democratic Party that were partly blamed for poor midterm election results during the Obama years. Ken Thomas, WSJ, "Pro-Biden Group to Raise Unlimited Sums, Won’t Disclose Donors," 21 Mar. 2021 At the meeting, Cox introduced a motion relating to midterm and final exams. Alec Johnson, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Two Cedarburg School Board members have been charged with violating open meetings laws," 17 Mar. 2021 Add to midterm savings, such as a high-interest savings account. Nerd Wallet, oregonlive, "Stimulus check spending: Here’s what you should do first, second, third with the extra money," 16 Mar. 2021 Some operatives in both parties agree Democrats don’t necessarily have to fear the midterm jinx. Eli Stokols, Los Angeles Times, "Biden’s early win on COVID-19 relief could be hard to repeat. Or he could be FDR," 10 Mar. 2021 The votes also come as 2022 midterm races begin to heat up, giving Republicans fodder for attack ads and progressives a reason to primary some of their more moderate colleagues. Nicole Goodkind, Fortune, "Senate Democrats remain divided over $15 minimum wage as they head into 2022 midterm season," 6 Mar. 2021 Republicans in Congress lined up instead behind Richard Nixon, who had led them to a huge midterm surge and better understood how to conduct the symphony of American grievances. Kevin Mahnken, The New Republic, "Mitt Romney’s Party of One," 12 Feb. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'midterm.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of midterm

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

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Time Traveler for midterm

Time Traveler

The first known use of midterm was in the 15th century

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Statistics for midterm

Last Updated

2 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Midterm.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/midterm. Accessed 12 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for midterm

midterm

noun

English Language Learners Definition of midterm

US
: an examination given at the middle of a school term
: the middle of a school term
: the middle of a term of office

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