medial collateral ligament

noun
plural medial collateral ligaments

Definition of medial collateral ligament

1 : a ligament of the inner knee that connects medial parts of the femur and tibia and helps to stabilize the knee joint … Barry Sanders, sprained the medial collateral ligament in his left knee on Thanksgiving, but the reports of his demise have been greatly exaggerated.— Peter King

called also MCL

2 : ulnar collateral ligament … preliminary review of an MRI conducted yesterday on Williamson's injured right arm indicated he may have torn the reconstructed medial collateral ligament in his elbow— Bob Hohler

called also MCL

Examples of medial collateral ligament in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Middleton sprained the medial collateral ligament in his left knee during Game 2 of the Bucks’ first-round series with the Chicago Bulls. Steve Megargee, Hartford Courant, 13 May 2022 Middleton sprained his medial collateral ligament (MCL) in Game 2 against Chicago in the first-round on April 20. Jim Owczarski, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 11 May 2022 Mike Budenholzer said an initial exam revealed a sprain of Middleton's medial collateral ligament (MCL). Jim Owczarski, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 20 Apr. 2022 The initial diagnosis revealed a medial collateral ligament sprain in his elbow. Evan Petzold, Detroit Free Press, 16 Apr. 2022 Uzomah sprained the medial collateral ligament in his left knee in the AFC Championship Game, yet still played 49 offensive snap (80 percent of the Bengals’ total) and caught two passes for 11 yards in the Super Bowl. Mark Inabinett | Minabinett@al.com, al, 17 Mar. 2022 Hampton fully practiced Wednesday and Thursday after spraining the medial collateral ligament in his left knee in a road loss to the Philadelphia 76ers on Jan. 19. Khobi Price, orlandosentinel.com, 24 Feb. 2022 Brooklyn is 5-16 since Durant sprained his left medial collateral ligament Jan. 15. Brian Mahoney, ajc, 3 Mar. 2022 Those injuries included the remnants of a ripped medial collateral ligament, a separated shoulder, a torn hamstring, and a broken elbow. NBD. Gordon Monson, The Salt Lake Tribune, 11 Feb. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'medial collateral ligament.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of medial collateral ligament

1914, in the meaning defined at sense 1

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Time Traveler for medial collateral ligament

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The first known use of medial collateral ligament was in 1914

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Dictionary Entries Near medial collateral ligament

medial cadence

medial collateral ligament

medial moraine

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Statistics for medial collateral ligament

Last Updated

17 May 2022

Cite this Entry

“Medial collateral ligament.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/medial%20collateral%20ligament. Accessed 18 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for medial collateral ligament

medial collateral ligament

noun

Medical Definition of medial collateral ligament

1 : a ligament that connects the medial epicondyle of the femur with the medial condyle and medial surface of the tibia and that helps to stabilize the knee by preventing lateral dislocation

called also MCL, tibial collateral ligament

— compare lateral collateral ligament sense 1
2 : ulnar collateral ligament sense 1

called also MCL

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