marmalade

noun
mar·​ma·​lade | \ ˈmär-mə-ˌlād How to pronounce marmalade (audio) \

Definition of marmalade

: a clear sweetened jelly in which pieces of fruit and fruit rind are suspended

Examples of marmalade in a Sentence

a jar of orange marmalade
Recent Examples on the Web The whisky balances sweet, floral notes and rich marmalade with flavors of honey, hazelnuts, walnuts, figs, and hints of wood smoke. Emma Reynolds, Forbes, 4 Nov. 2021 This 40/30/30 blend of Carignan/Grenache/Cinsault is a Languedoc red from the Corbières appellation that includes creamy and layered aromas of prunes, apricots, oranges and sultanas, with a little hickory, marmalade and smoke. Tom Mullen, Forbes, 31 Oct. 2021 On the sweet side: Semolina likely will stock items such as marmalade and honey. Carol Deptolla, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 14 Oct. 2021 As a result, the juice absorbs their color, and the beverage morphs into a marmalade shade. Elise Taylor, Vogue, 7 Oct. 2021 The marmalade sandwich enthusiast first sweetened hearts back in 1958, when British author Michael Bond penned a book with a rather on-the-nose title: A Bear Called Paddington. Cailey Rizzo, Travel + Leisure, 9 Aug. 2021 Moments later, a server enlisted my help in prying open a jar of marmalade. David Kortava, The New Yorker, 15 Oct. 2021 The marmalade sandwich enthusiast first sweetened hearts back in 1958, when British author Michael Bond penned a book with a rather on-the-nose title: A Bear Called Paddington. Cailey Rizzo, Travel + Leisure, 9 Aug. 2021 The 5,183-square-foot marmalade-toned stone home, called Dunbeg House, was completed circa 1903 by Bishop Alexander Chinnery-Haldane, the Episcopal Bishop of Argyll and the Isles, for his eldest son. New York Times, 15 Sep. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'marmalade.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of marmalade

circa 1676, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for marmalade

Middle English marmelat quince conserve, Portuguese marmelada, from marmelo quince, from Latin melimelum, a sweet apple, from Greek melimēlon, from meli honey + mēlon apple — more at mellifluous

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Time Traveler for marmalade

Time Traveler

The first known use of marmalade was circa 1676

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Dictionary Entries Near marmalade

marm

marmalade

marmalade box

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Statistics for marmalade

Last Updated

24 Nov 2021

Cite this Entry

“Marmalade.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/marmalade. Accessed 2 Dec. 2021.

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More Definitions for marmalade

marmalade

noun

English Language Learners Definition of marmalade

: a sweet jelly that contains pieces of fruit

marmalade

noun
mar·​ma·​lade | \ ˈmär-mə-ˌlād How to pronounce marmalade (audio) \

Kids Definition of marmalade

: a jam containing pieces of fruit and fruit rind orange marmalade

More from Merriam-Webster on marmalade

Nglish: Translation of marmalade for Spanish Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about marmalade

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