marmalade

noun
mar·​ma·​lade | \ ˈmär-mə-ˌlād How to pronounce marmalade (audio) \

Definition of marmalade

: a clear sweetened jelly in which pieces of fruit and fruit rind are suspended

Examples of marmalade in a Sentence

a jar of orange marmalade
Recent Examples on the Web Make the glaze: In a small saucepan over medium heat, whisk together the marmalade, soy sauce, ginger, sriracha and five-spice powder. Washington Post, "Orange-sriracha glazed duck and roasted fruit are a stunning sheet-pan dinner combination," 10 Nov. 2020 Especially with their new warm drinks menu, which includes a hot buttered rum with raspberries or hot smoked toddy with marmalade. Elise Taylor, Vogue, "These Are Officially the Best Bars in America," 6 Nov. 2020 As a last-ditch attempt to save face, the farmer shredded his disastrous pancake and topped it with sugar and marmalade. Washington Post, "Make the roasted plums: Position a baking rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 350 degrees.," 5 Aug. 2020 Prepare serving cups by putting a layer of pineapple marmalade on the bottom, then a layer of chia pudding on top. Kimberly Wilson, Essence, "Escape To The Caribbean With These Soulful Recipes," 29 Apr. 2020 Josephine’s Feast marmalades, $12 to $16; three, $46; box of four, $60, josephinesfeast.com. Florence Fabricant, New York Times, "Marmalades Make a Mother’s Day Gift," 27 Apr. 2020 Cook's note: To make Maple-Orange Glaze, in a small saucepan combine ¾ cup maple syrup, ½ cup orange marmalade, 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard, 1 teaspoon pepper and 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon. Susan Selasky, Detroit Free Press, "Everything you need to know about buying, preparing, baking Easter ham," 8 Apr. 2020 On Triple D Nation, Cane Rosso’s crew cooked zucchini and artichoke fritters and a pizza called the Billy Ray Valentine: mozzarella, vodka sauce, smoked bacon, bacon marmalade and Sweety Drop peppers. Sarah Blaskovich, Dallas News, "D-FW pizza joint Cane Rosso will again appear on Food Network TV show," 21 Feb. 2020 Top with half each of the marmalade, blueberries, and custard. Taylor Murray, Country Living, "Fruit and Nut Trifle," 30 Oct. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'marmalade.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of marmalade

circa 1676, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for marmalade

Middle English marmelat quince conserve, Portuguese marmelada, from marmelo quince, from Latin melimelum, a sweet apple, from Greek melimēlon, from meli honey + mēlon apple — more at mellifluous

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Time Traveler for marmalade

Time Traveler

The first known use of marmalade was circa 1676

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Statistics for marmalade

Last Updated

23 Nov 2020

Cite this Entry

“Marmalade.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/marmalade. Accessed 27 Nov. 2020.

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More Definitions for marmalade

marmalade

noun
How to pronounce marmalade (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of marmalade

: a sweet jelly that contains pieces of fruit

marmalade

noun
mar·​ma·​lade | \ ˈmär-mə-ˌlād How to pronounce marmalade (audio) \

Kids Definition of marmalade

: a jam containing pieces of fruit and fruit rind orange marmalade

More from Merriam-Webster on marmalade

Nglish: Translation of marmalade for Spanish Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about marmalade

Comments on marmalade

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