litigant

noun
lit·​i·​gant | \ ˈli-ti-gənt \

Definition of litigant

: one engaged in a lawsuit

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Other Words from litigant

litigant adjective

Examples of litigant in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web

Based on the outcomes, Mr. Finkelman concludes that Marshall never once sided with the cause of freedom, even overturning decisions in which Southern judges and juries freed slave litigants. Marc M. Arkin, WSJ, "‘Supreme Injustice’ Review: The High Court and Slavery," 18 Jan. 2019 The ruling won't necessarily have an impact on the net neutrality case, in which Pai is defending the repeal and preemption of state laws against dozens of litigants including more than 20 state attorneys general. Jon Brodkin, Ars Technica, "Ajit Pai helped Charter kill consumer-protection rules in Minnesota," 10 Sep. 2018 The elder Smith played a small role in the civil rights movement as a litigant in Baker v. Carr, a key voting rights case that reached the U.S. Supreme Court in 1962. Daniela Altimari, courant.com, "He Was In Sarajevo During The Siege And Kabul After 9/11. Now Guy Smith Wants to Be Governor.," 14 June 2018 But West, a regular litigant in government-transparency cases who this week received $13,000 to settle a similar OPMA case against the city of Yakima, noted Bradshaw simply didn’t buy the city’s main argument. Lewis Kamb, The Seattle Times, "Judge orders political consultant, city of Seattle to disclose polling results, other records related to council’s abrupt head-tax repeal," 18 Oct. 2018 Never mind his hundreds of opinions, the universal praise by litigants who have appeared before him, and the scores of women and men who’ve worked for and effusively praise him. Libby Locke, WSJ, "How It Feels To Be Falsely Accused," 4 Oct. 2018 As the industry booms, state and federal authorities are beginning to look into a specialized corner that provides high-interest cash advances to litigants waiting for settlements or jury awards. Matthew Goldstein, New York Times, "Hedge Funds Look to Profit From Personal-Injury Suits," 25 June 2018 Technically, court officials can’t force litigants to take part in mediation, although participants are led to believe the process is required. Corinne Ramey, WSJ, "New York to Litigants: Let’s Settle Those Lawsuits," 4 July 2018 The office expected the most questions to come from self-representing litigants who may not have email addresses and may require extra help. Elyssa Cherney, chicagotribune.com, "After months of delay, Cook County begins first day of electronic filing for civil cases," 2 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'litigant.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of litigant

1659, in the meaning defined above

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Statistics for litigant

Last Updated

25 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for litigant

The first known use of litigant was in 1659

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More Definitions for litigant

litigant

noun

English Language Learners Definition of litigant

law : a person who is involved in a lawsuit : someone who is suing another person or is being sued by another person

litigant

noun
lit·​i·​gant | \ ˈli-ti-gənt \

Legal Definition of litigant

: an active party to litigation

Other Words from litigant

litigant adjective

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More from Merriam-Webster on litigant

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for litigant

Spanish Central: Translation of litigant

Nglish: Translation of litigant for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of litigant for Arabic Speakers

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