libido

noun
li·​bi·​do | \ lə-ˈbē-(ˌ)dō How to pronounce libido (audio) also ˈli-bə-ˌdō How to pronounce libido (audio) or lə-ˈbī-(ˌ)dō How to pronounce libido (audio) \
plural libidos

Definition of libido

1 : instinctual psychic energy that in psychoanalytic theory is derived from primitive biological urges (as for sexual pleasure or self-preservation) and that is expressed in conscious activity
2 : sexual drive The drug was used to increase libido.

Did you know?

The Latin word libido, meaning "desire, lust", was borrowed by Sigmund Freud as the name for a concept in his own theories. At first he defined libido to mean the instinctual energy associated with the sex drive. Later he broadened the word's meaning and began using it to mean the mental energy behind purposeful human activity of any kind; in other words, the libido (for which Freud also used the term eros, a Greek word meaning "sexual love") came to be regarded as the life instinct, which included sex along with all the other impulses we rely on to keep us alive. But those of us who aren't psychologists use the word simply as a synonym for "sex drive".

Examples of libido in a Sentence

Lack of libido may be a sign of depression.
Recent Examples on the Web Loss of libido around menopause and perimenopause, for example, is normal, if not universal, as hormone fluctuations can have an effect. Stephanie Dolgoff, Good Housekeeping, 1 Aug. 2022 Women also have concerns about whether certain methods will cause weight gain, changes in mood, libido or energy level. Julie Washington, cleveland, 11 July 2022 The supplement can improve energy, gym performance, and muscle growth while increasing libido. Sophie Saint Thomas, Forbes, 7 May 2022 Earlier attempts at male birth control pills have largely worked by blocking testosterone, which can lead to depression, weight gain, and decreased libido. Corryn Wetzel, Smithsonian Magazine, 25 Mar. 2022 At home, the big red monster must be suppressed, along with her goofy personality and raging libido. Los Angeles Times, 7 Mar. 2022 More than a year after the death of the stallion Laoban, the Kentucky Board of Veterinary Examiners has launched an investigation into the treatment that was intended to stir his libido but instead killed him. Tim Sullivan, The Courier-Journal, 8 June 2022 Beavis and Butt-Head are two teenage slackers who share an extreme libido and complete inability to attract women. Wilson Chapman, Variety, 2 June 2022 Learning a bit more about the female libido and some of the forces that affect it as women age. Lisa Mulcahy, Good Housekeeping, 1 May 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'libido.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of libido

1909, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for libido

New Latin libidin-, libido, from Latin, desire, lust, from libēre to please — more at love

Learn More About libido

Dictionary Entries Near libido

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libido

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Statistics for libido

Last Updated

12 Aug 2022

Cite this Entry

“Libido.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/libido. Accessed 14 Aug. 2022.

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More Definitions for libido

libido

noun
li·​bi·​do | \ lə-ˈbēd-(ˌ)ō also ˈlib-ə-ˌdō or lə-ˈbī-(ˌ)dō \
plural libidos

Medical Definition of libido

1 : instinctual psychic energy that in psychoanalytic theory is derived from primitive biological urges (as for sexual pleasure or self-preservation) and that is expressed in conscious activity
2 : sexual drive

More from Merriam-Webster on libido

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for libido

Nglish: Translation of libido for Spanish Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about libido

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