lectern

noun

lec·​tern ˈlek-tərn How to pronounce lectern (audio)
: a stand used to support a book or script in a convenient position for a standing reader or speaker
especially : one from which scripture lessons are read in a church service

Examples of lectern in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web The first lady stood at the lectern, her lips pursed in a small, tight smile, while security guards escorted and, in at least one case, dragged protesters out. Faith E. Pinho, Los Angeles Times, 25 Mar. 2024 Judy Smith, who served as a deputy press secretary for President George H.W. Bush, and was , said the weight of the White House briefing room is felt by those who sit on both sides of the lectern. Erica L. Green, New York Times, 21 Jan. 2024 Given the publicity surrounding the lectern, the best thing Empress Sarah can say at this point is mea culpa. Arkansas Online, 17 Oct. 2023 Seconds ticked away as the man at the lectern tried to compose himself enough to speak. Theresa Vargas, Washington Post, 6 Mar. 2024 The smaller venues allow Biden to engage with voters in a more natural way than from behind a lectern. Deepa Shivaram, NPR, 2 Mar. 2024 Hickey broke down his audit request in three different parts: A review of the lectern's purchase. Neal Earley, Arkansas Online, 13 Oct. 2023 Maria Camps-Lacayo stood at a courtroom lectern Wednesday and cried in pain, tears running down her cheeks, as four years of pent- up emotion and anger poured out. Charles Rabin, Miami Herald, 22 Feb. 2024 Martha Joynt Kumar, a presidency scholar who has documented the relationship between the press and the White House for decades, said the Dunnigan-Payne lectern was a rare showing of solidarity between the White House and the press corps. Erica L. Green, New York Times, 21 Jan. 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'lectern.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English lettorne, from Anglo-French leitrun, from Medieval Latin lectrinum, from Late Latin lectrum, from Latin legere to read — more at legend

First Known Use

14th century, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of lectern was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near lectern

Cite this Entry

“Lectern.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/lectern. Accessed 20 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

lectern

noun
lec·​tern ˈlek-tərn How to pronounce lectern (audio)
: a desk to read from while standing
especially : one from which scripture lessons are read in a church service

More from Merriam-Webster on lectern

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