knock

verb
\ ˈnäk How to pronounce knock (audio) \
knocked; knocking; knocks

Definition of knock

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to strike something with a sharp blow
2 : to collide with something
3a : bustle heard them knocking around in the kitchen
b : wander knocked about Europe all summer
4a : to make a pounding noise
b : to have engine knock
5 : to find fault

transitive verb

1a(1) : to strike sharply
(2) : to drive, force, or make by or as if by so striking was knocked out of the campaign
b : to set forcibly in motion with a blow
2 : to cause to collide
3 : to find fault with always knocking those in authority
knock cold knock dead
: to move strongly especially to admiration or applause a comedian who really knocks them dead
knock for a loop
1a : overcome knocked my opponent for a loop
b : demolish knocked our idea for a loop
2 : dumbfound, amaze the news knocked them for a loop
knock one's socks off
: to overwhelm or amaze one a performance that will knock your socks off
knock on wood
used interjectionally to ward off misfortune
knock together
: to make or assemble especially hurriedly or in a makeshift way knocked together my own bookcase

knock

noun

Definition of knock (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : a sharp blow : rap, hit a loud knock on the door
b(1) : a severe misfortune or hardship
(2) : setback, reversal
2a : a pounding noise
b : a sharp repetitive metallic noise caused by abnormal ignition in an automobile engine
3 : a harsh and often petty criticism the knock on him was that he couldn't handle the pressure

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Examples of knock in a Sentence

Verb

The ball knocked him on the chin. She knocked the glass from his hand. He knocked the baseball over the fence. The ball hit him in the mouth and knocked out one of his teeth. The wind knocked him backwards. The dog knocked against the lamp. My knee accidentally knocked against the table. Skaters were knocking into each other all over the ice. I accidentally knocked my knee against the table.

Noun

He gave him a knock on the head. There was a loud knock at the door. She took some knocks early in her career. He likes praise but can't stand the knocks.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The also let Read spare his shareholders the immediate dilution of a mega share sale at a knock-down price. Washington Post, "Vodafone’s $4.5 Billion Happy Meal for Hedge Funds," 18 Sep. 2019 The national media likes to talk about the primary as a knock-out fight between moderate and liberal Democrats. Nic Garcia, The Denver Post, "Four things I learned about the 2020 Democratic presidential primary in Iowa," 15 Aug. 2019 One popular Internet theory claims that the double-knock Netflix subscribers hear when starting up any of the service's shows is a reference to the series's dramatic season two closing shot. Isaac Feldberg, Fortune, "‘Grace and Frankie’ Is Ending. How Did It Become Netflix’s Longest-Running Show?," 5 Sep. 2019 Add the knock-on cost for airlines and for the supply chain and a rough estimate is that every quarter that the best-selling airliner remains on the ground costs $4bn. The Economist, "Boeing’s troubles cost the aerospace industry $4bn a quarter," 22 Aug. 2019 Fall in expectations The reason why financial crises cannot always be solved through monetary and financial measures alone is because of the knock-on effect unemployment can have in an economy. Rahul Menon, Quartz India, "India’s economic slump is far too deep to be tackled with mere tinkering of interest rates," 7 Aug. 2019 In a letter dated July 15 and addressed to the police department, Deputy State’s Attorney Robin Coffin said a no-knock warrant was carried out on the motel room because Morgan was believed to be armed with a handgun. Lillian Reed, baltimoresun.com, "Baltimore County state’s attorney clears officer in fatal Duke’s Motel shooting," 24 July 2019 One of the knock-on effects is also that the clock has become increasingly meaningless. Joshua Robinson, WSJ, "Video Assistant Referee Technology Grinds the Women’s World Cup to a Halt," 25 June 2019 Counting the knock-on effect to other sectors, economists estimate that real estate activity contributes somewhere between 20% and 30% of China’s GDP. Gwynn Guilford, Quartz, "China’s debt disease might wreck its uncrashable housing market," 11 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'knock.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of knock

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for knock

Verb

Middle English knoken, from Old English cnocian; akin to Middle High German knochen to press

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Statistics for knock

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Time Traveler for knock

The first known use of knock was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for knock

knock

verb

English Language Learners Definition of knock

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to hit something (such as a door) with the knuckles of your hand or with a hard object (such as a knocker) in order to get people's attention
: to hit (something or someone) in a forceful way
: to touch or hit someone or something in a way that is not planned or intended

knock

noun

English Language Learners Definition of knock (Entry 2 of 2)

: a hard, sharp hit
: the sound made by a hard hit
informal : an experience that makes you less confident or successful for a period of time : a difficult or painful experience

knock

verb
\ ˈnäk How to pronounce knock (audio) \
knocked; knocking

Kids Definition of knock

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to strike in order to get someone's attention I knocked before entering.
2 : to bump against something without intending to Careful! You knocked the lamp.
3 : to make a pounding noise The car's engine began knocking.
4 : to find fault with Don't knock it till you try it.
5 : to hit forcefully He knocked the ball out of the park.
knock down
1 : to strike to the ground with or as if with a sharp blow
2 : to take apart Knock down the tent before you leave camp.
knock off
: to stop doing something Hey, I don't like that, so knock it off!
knock over
: to cause to fall

knock

noun

Kids Definition of knock (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a pounding noise I heard a knock at the door.
2 : a sharp blow a knock on the head
3 : a difficult or painful experience You learn from life's knocks.

knock

noun
\ ˈnäk How to pronounce knock (audio) \

Medical Definition of knock

1 : a sharp blow a knock to the head
2 : a sharp pounding noise

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More from Merriam-Webster on knock

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for knock

Spanish Central: Translation of knock

Nglish: Translation of knock for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of knock for Arabic Speakers

Comments on knock

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