keep score

idiom

: to officially record the number of points, goals, runs, etc., that each player or team gets in a game or contest
sometimes used figuratively
If you're keeping score, this is the third time that he has run for mayor and lost.

Examples of keep score in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Price at time of publish: $26 Even the best of friends keep score on the course, so a scorecard book is essential for friendly competition. Rebecca Jones, Southern Living, 7 Dec. 2023 While some keep score for all the wrong reasons, folding in thankfulness turns a maddening game into a collaborative, satisfying, fun game. Paige Francis, Forbes, 11 Dec. 2023 This game is also compatible with Amazon Alexa, who can keep score, teach you the rules, and even play against you. Cheryl Fenton, Parents, 27 Oct. 2023 Jill Penrose, Smucker’s chief people and administrative officer, who executed the plan, now tells Fortune the company isn’t using attendance to keep score but rather focusing on purposely bringing employees together. Paige McGlauflin, Fortune, 6 Oct. 2023 The band will keep score, and a winner for each group will be announced. Todd Martens, Los Angeles Times, 25 Oct. 2023 Each time the broadcaster made a Swift reference, there would be a dinging noise to keep score. Angel Saunders, Peoplemag, 19 Sep. 2023 Now the pair start to keep score, tallying up a point each time one of them says something that destabilizes the other. Peter Debruge, Variety, 3 Sep. 2023 But that’s not the only way to keep score in the final round. Doug Ferguson, Chicago Tribune, 19 Aug. 2023

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'keep score.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Dictionary Entries Near keep score

Cite this Entry

“Keep score.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/keep%20score. Accessed 13 Apr. 2024.

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