juice

noun
\ ˈjüs How to pronounce juice (audio) \

Definition of juice

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the extractable fluid contents of cells or tissues
2 : a motivating, inspiring, or enabling force or factor creative juices
3 : a medium (such as electricity or gasoline) that supplies power
4a juices plural : the natural fluids of an animal body
b : the liquid or moisture contained in something
5a : the inherent quality of a thing : essence
b : strength, vigor, vitality pioneers … full of juice and jests— Sinclair Lewis
6 slang : liquor
7 slang : exorbitant interest exacted of a borrower under the threat of violence
8 slang : influence, clout

juice

verb
juiced; juicing

Definition of juice (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to extract the juice of
2 : to add juice to

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from juice

Noun

juiceless \ ˈjüs-​ləs How to pronounce juiceless (audio) \ adjective

Examples of juice in a Sentence

Noun

a glass of apple juice a variety of fruit juices the juice of a steak gravy made with real beef juices His camera ran out of juice because he forgot to replace the battery.
See More

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

But the most important thing was the porters, who gave you twice as much orange juice, or four sandwiches and two pillows. The New Yorker, "Toni Morrison on Her Last Novel and the Voices of Her Characters," 7 Aug. 2019 There was no marker or memorial commemorating the place where the women had been killed, just a few tables where a handful of hikers sat drinking orange juice and looking out over the valley where birds swooped down between very old mountains. Rachel Monroe, Outside Online, "Last winter, Moroccan officials found two hikers dead on the trail to the highest peak in the Atlas Mountains. The international investigation that followed revealed the fragility of the adventure travel economy, as well as what happens when a small tourist hub is suddenly made strange by violence.," 29 July 2019 Heavy white and yellow slimy growth on plastic insert of nozzle used to dispense fresh orange juice. Ebony Day, azcentral, "White and yellow slime on orange juice dispenser found in this week's restaurant inspections," 17 July 2019 But the pact should improve market access for French cheese, Brazilian orange juice and Argentine fish, as well as car parts made in Europe, which now attract Mercosur tariffs of 14-18%. The Economist, "A new trade deal has FOMO as its secret sauce," 5 July 2019 Pour the bourbon, Grand Marnier and fresh orange juice in the glass. Dana Mcmahan, The Courier-Journal, "Fried chicken with Champagne? Why this quirky culinary combo is a must-try," 2 July 2019 The latter is mixed with white rum and a mix of pineapple, lime and orange juices with hints of coconut and cherry. Marcy De Luna, Houston Chronicle, "Applebee's is offering 50-cent Dollaritas for one day only," 28 June 2019 Bahama Breeze makes its libation with Bacardi Silver and Black Rums, banana liqueur, blackberry brandy, orange juice and grenadine. Doreen Christensen, sun-sentinel.com, "Celebrate the first day of summer with $5 rum cocktails at Bahama Breeze on Friday," 21 June 2019 Bub’s @ the Beach will pair its gravy and biscuits with a Man-mosa, a tall drink made with Smirnoff Orange, orange juice and Bub’s house bubbly, topped with a 12-ounce can of Miller High Life served in a mini pitcher. San Diego Union-Tribune, "The Dish: Sunday is Father’s Day. Have you made your dinner reservations yet?," 11 June 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Thus a half-point drop would be a positive surprise, andwould probably juice the stock market the most. Larry Light, Fortune, "Here Are the Fed’s Four Options for a Rate Cut—and How the Market Will React to Each," 29 July 2019 Alibaba is looking to juice its growth, which has been held in check by Amazon and threatened by trade tensions between the U.S. and China. Anne D'innocenzio, chicagotribune.com, "China’s Alibaba is taking on Amazon, opening its e-commerce platform to more U.S. sellers," 23 July 2019 Sustainable single-party governance usually requires that party to win sweeping electoral majorities — not simply juice the turnout of 45 percent of the electorate. Fred Bauer, National Review, "The Fundamental Tension of the Trump Presidency," 19 July 2019 Any company that wanted to juice its average daily attendance allotment could switch students between the different calendars, so that the child never had any breaks. The Washington Post, The Mercury News, "How does a $50 million charter scam work? Here’s what happened in California (before 11 people were indicted).," 17 June 2019 The risk is this will simply juice another bubble in the Chinese bond market, just like the one the central bank pricked in early 2017. Nathaniel Taplin, WSJ, "Why China’s Deleveraging Has Faltered," 23 Nov. 2018 Why include these unrelated federal offices in the calculation, unless the goal is to juice the Democratic average? The Editorial Board, WSJ, "Gerrymandering a State Constitution," 3 Dec. 2018 He is expected to provide a new perspective on on-track activity and could juice NBC’s viewership numbers considerably. Mike Hembree, USA TODAY, "Dale Earnhardt Jr. ready to kick NASCAR on NBC coverage into new gear," 28 June 2018 This included two Star Wars movies and three Marvel movies, highlighting the company’s ability to take over iconic properties and juice them up further. Aaron Back, WSJ, "Why Disney Can Afford to Pay More for Fox," 20 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'juice.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of juice

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1603, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for juice

Noun

Middle English jus, from Anglo-French, broth, juice, from Latin; akin to Old Norse ostr cheese, Greek zymē leaven, Sanskrit yūṣa broth

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about juice

Statistics for juice

Last Updated

11 Aug 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for juice

The first known use of juice was in the 14th century

See more words from the same century

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for juice

juice

noun

English Language Learners Definition of juice

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the liquid part that can be squeezed out of vegetables and fruits
: the liquid part of meat
informal : something (such as electricity) that provides power

juice

verb

English Language Learners Definition of juice (Entry 2 of 2)

: to remove juice from (a fruit or vegetable)

juice

noun
\ ˈjüs How to pronounce juice (audio) \

Kids Definition of juice

1 : the liquid part that can be squeezed out of vegetables and fruit
2 : the liquid part of meat

juice

noun
\ ˈjüs How to pronounce juice (audio) \

Medical Definition of juice

1 : the extractable fluid contents of cells or tissues
2a : a natural bodily fluid (as blood, lymph, or a secretion) — see gastric juice, intestinal juice, pancreatic juice
b : the liquid or moisture contained in something

Keep scrolling for more

More from Merriam-Webster on juice

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with juice

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for juice

Spanish Central: Translation of juice

Nglish: Translation of juice for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of juice for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about juice

Comments on juice

What made you want to look up juice? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

a period when something is suspended

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Summer 2019 Words of the Day Quiz

  • a-bowl-of-peach-sorbet-with-cut-peaches-next-to-it
  • Which is a synonym of desideratum?
Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
Word Winder's CrossWinder

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!