joy

noun
\ ˈjȯi How to pronounce joy (audio) \

Definition of joy

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : the emotion evoked by well-being, success, or good fortune or by the prospect of possessing what one desires : delight
b : the expression or exhibition of such emotion : gaiety
2 : a state of happiness or felicity : bliss
3 : a source or cause of delight

joy

verb
joyed; joying; joys

Definition of joy (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to experience great pleasure or delight : rejoice

transitive verb

1 archaic : gladden
2 archaic : enjoy

Other Words from joy

Noun

joyless \ ˈjȯi-​ləs How to pronounce joy (audio) \ adjective
joylessly adverb
joylessness noun

Examples of joy in a Sentence

Noun Their sorrow turned to joy. I can hardly express the joy I felt at seeing her again. Seeing her again brought tears of joy to my eyes. The flowers are a joy to behold! What a joy it was to see her again. Verb the whole town is joying in the fact that its oldest church has been restored to its Victorian splendor See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The sad occasion of a funeral becomes one of joy when Aileen’s beloved son Brian (Paul Mescal) returns home unannounced after several years in Australia, cut off from the family. David Rooney, The Hollywood Reporter, 19 May 2022 Following the exciting news, fans have been flooding Twitter with congratulatory messages, and the newborn bundle of joy quickly became a trending topic on the platform. Rania Aniftos, Billboard, 19 May 2022 His commercials give a daily jolt of joy to a city that has had, at best, an uneven effort to return to normalcy in downtown Hartford amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Ted Glanzer, Hartford Courant, 16 May 2022 Reading can also, as Dickinson discovered, incite almost inordinate forms of joy. Jane Yong Kim, The Atlantic, 16 May 2022 While there was still plenty of joy, there were also whispers and prayers for victims of the shooting at nearby Geneva Presbyterian, less than a mile away. Los Angeles Times, 15 May 2022 There were tears of joy, and relief, at being able to gather again, to listen to live music in a space without fear of restrictions or judgment, after the event was put on pause for two years because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Palak Jayswal, The Salt Lake Tribune, 15 May 2022 The new bundle of joy was announced May 7 and was 4-year-old wallaby Sprocket's first joey. Miriam Marini, Detroit Free Press, 13 May 2022 Friday, the senior right-hander brought tears of joy to his Patrick Henry High teammates. John Maffei, San Diego Union-Tribune, 13 May 2022 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb They joy and camaraderie between them was infectious. Steve Baltin, Forbes, 26 Mar. 2022 Trump would know about taking the life and joy out of everything. Neil J. Young, The Week, 30 July 2021 If people can pay good deeds forward, causing kindness to grow exponentially, can joy spread from one person to the next? Washington Post, 11 Dec. 2021 The last album, performed by the L.A.-based ensemble Wild Up and overseen by Seth Parker Woods, Richard Valitutto, and Christopher Rountree, is the most vital of the lot—an ode of and to joy. Alex Ross, The New Yorker, 9 Dec. 2021 And each has discovered ways to continue bringing light and joy into the world. Julianna Morano, Dallas News, 16 Sep. 2021 This painting inspires joy rather like Hokusai’s beautiful blue skies, an almost tactile sense of the atmosphere as something that sustains and protects us. Washington Post, 16 July 2021 Typically, a Tanglewood summer sends everyone off with Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 and its famous paean to joy. BostonGlobe.com, 16 Aug. 2021 Burkina Faso gained its independence from France in 1960 -- and often joy. Nick Remsen, CNN, 22 June 2021 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'joy.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of joy

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for joy

Noun and Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French joie, from Latin gaudia, plural of gaudium, from gaudēre to rejoice; probably akin to Greek gēthein to rejoice

Learn More About joy

Time Traveler for joy

Time Traveler

The first known use of joy was in the 13th century

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Dictionary Entries Near joy

jowter

joy

joyance

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Statistics for joy

Last Updated

23 May 2022

Cite this Entry

“Joy.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/joy. Accessed 25 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for joy

joy

noun
\ ˈjȯi How to pronounce joy (audio) \

Kids Definition of joy

1 : a feeling of pleasure or happiness that comes from success, good fortune, or a sense of well-being
2 : something that gives pleasure or happiness It's a joy to have you visit.

More from Merriam-Webster on joy

Nglish: Translation of joy for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of joy for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about joy

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