inundate

verb
in·​un·​date | \ ˈi-(ˌ)nən-ˌdāt How to pronounce inundate (audio) \
inundated; inundating

Definition of inundate

transitive verb

1 : overwhelm was inundated with phone calls
2 : to cover with a flood : overflow

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Other Words from inundate

inundation \ ˌi-​(ˌ)nən-​ˈdā-​shən How to pronounce inundation (audio) \ noun
inundator \ ˈi-​(ˌ)nən-​ˌdā-​tər How to pronounce inundator (audio) \ noun
inundatory \ i-​ˈnən-​də-​ˌtȯr-​ē How to pronounce inundatory (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms & Antonyms for inundate

Synonyms

Antonyms

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Did You Know?

In the summer of 1993, record rains in the Midwest caused the Mississippi River to overflow its banks, break through levees, and inundate the entire countryside; such an inundation hadn't been seen for at least a hundred years. By contrast, the Nile River inundated its entire valley every year, bringing the rich black silt that made the valley one of the most fertile places on earth. (The inundations ceased with the completion of the Aswan High Dam in 1970.) Whenever a critical issue is being debated, the White House and Congressional offices are inundated with phone calls and e-mails, just as a town may be inundated with complaints when it starts charging a fee for garbage pickup.

Examples of inundate in a Sentence

Rising rivers could inundate low-lying areas. water from the overflowing bathtub inundated the bathroom floor
Recent Examples on the Web Arifuzzman Bhuiyan, an engineer with the warning center, said Sunday that waters would continue to inundate low-lying areas over the next week, affecting croplands and homes. Washington Post, "Bangladesh’s northern regions brace for monsoon floods," 28 June 2020 Storm surges of approximately one to two meters (3.3 to 6.6 foot) are likely to inundate low-lying areas of Mumbai, Thane and Raigad districts, the IMD said. CNN, "Cyclone Nisarga: Coronavirus patients evacuated ahead of worst storm to hit Mumbai in 70 years," 3 June 2020 There’s that moment, before the waves crash and inundate the shore, when the water is pulled back out into the sea and those who are paying attention understand the horror that’s to come. Erin Allday, SFChronicle.com, "‘There’s no way we can go back to what we were before’: The Bay Area is learning to live with the coronavirus," 21 June 2020 The weather service said coastal flooding along the shoreline of northern Mobile Bay is forecast to inundate surge-prone areas between 3 and 3.5 feet above normally dry trough through this afternoon during high tide. Leigh Morgan, al, "Strong storms, more heavy rain possible in Alabama today thanks to Cristobal," 8 June 2020 Officials were concerned that storm surges would inundate the low-lying areas -- where many people live in flimsy or makeshift housing -- and that intense rainfall could lead to deadly flooding. Helen Regan, CNN, "India's cyclone response saves lives. Climate resilient infrastructure will save livelihoods," 4 June 2020 Floods in Thailand in 2011, which killed 813 people and affected 9.5m, had the biggest relative economic effect, inundating South-East Asia’s biggest carmaking industry and costing 10% of Thai GDP. The Economist, "Daily chart Why are investors not pricing in climate-change risk?," 2 June 2020 The Paradise Valley Police Department asked residents to please stop inundating dispatchers with non-urgent calls. Kaila White, azcentral, "4th night of Phoenix protests ends with arrests shortly after 8 p.m. curfew," 1 June 2020 Relentless flooding in the central US inundated communities and damaged or spilled over levees on three major rivers in two states. BostonGlobe.com, "This day in history," 31 May 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'inundate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of inundate

1590, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for inundate

Latin inundatus, past participle of inundare, from in- + unda wave — more at water

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Time Traveler for inundate

Time Traveler

The first known use of inundate was in 1590

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Statistics for inundate

Last Updated

10 Jul 2020

Cite this Entry

“Inundate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/inundate. Accessed 11 Aug. 2020.

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More Definitions for inundate

inundate

verb
How to pronounce inundate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of inundate

: to cause (someone or something) to receive or take in a large amount of things at the same time
formal : to cover (something) with a flood of water

inundate

verb
in·​un·​date | \ ˈin-ən-ˌdāt How to pronounce inundate (audio) \
inundated; inundating

Kids Definition of inundate

: to cover with or as if with a flood I'm inundated by mail.

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Comments on inundate

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