intrude

verb

in·​trude in-ˈtrüd How to pronounce intrude (audio)
intruded; intruding

intransitive verb

1
: to thrust oneself in without invitation, permission, or welcome
2
: to enter as a geologic intrusion

transitive verb

1
: to thrust or force in or upon someone or something especially without permission, welcome, or fitness
intruded himself into their lives
2
: to cause to enter as if by force
intruder noun

Examples of intrude in a Sentence

Excuse me, sir. I don't mean to intrude, but you have a phone call. Would I be intruding if I came along with you? The plane intruded into their airspace. Reporters constantly intruded into the couple's private life. He didn't want to intrude upon their conversation.
Recent Examples on the Web China accused the Philippines of intruding on its territory, claiming indisputable sovereignty over the reef, located 1,300 km (808 miles) off its mainland. Reuters, NBC News, 6 Mar. 2024 But when Swift dares intrude on the NFL, a segment of people lose their ever-loving minds. USA TODAY, 20 Jan. 2024 But even though national security and foreign policy occasionally intruded on corporate America during that time, until very recently, few executives concerned themselves with geopolitics. Jami Miscik, Foreign Affairs, 11 Mar. 2024 Reactions were a problem not because private data was collected and shared, but instead because the feature intruded on a private space. IEEE Spectrum, 9 Mar. 2024 The Red Scare and McCarthy era—when U.S. officials attacked artists, writers, and filmmakers tarred as communist sympathizers—exposed the dangers of government intruding into the realms of art and creativity. Suzanne Nossel, Foreign Affairs, 29 Feb. 2024 The fateful red hand that intrudes into other works here smears blood on that wall, as if left behind by a slumping body. Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times, 16 Feb. 2024 The big opportunity lies in helping consumers resolve these tensions to bridge the gaps: Doing more vs. doing less – People are doing more in and asking more from our homes, creating the need for multifunctional spaces, where work and play can coexist and not intrude on each other. Pamela N. Danziger, Forbes, 28 Feb. 2024 Thin high-level clouds intrude on the eclipse track from Arkansas to Lake Erie; Newfoundland is covered with stratocumulus clouds. Jay Anderson, Discover Magazine, 21 Feb. 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'intrude.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English, from Latin intrudere to thrust in, from in- + trudere to thrust — more at threat

First Known Use

15th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of intrude was in the 15th century

Dictionary Entries Near intrude

Cite this Entry

“Intrude.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/intrude. Accessed 18 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

intrude

verb
in·​trude in-ˈtrüd How to pronounce intrude (audio)
intruded; intruding
1
: to bring or force in unasked
2
: to come or go in without invitation
intruder noun

Legal Definition

intrude

verb
in·​trude in-ˈtrüd How to pronounce intrude (audio)
intruded; intruding

intransitive verb

1
: to enter by intrusion
2
: encroach
a search that intrudes on a person's privacy

transitive verb

: to encroach on or upon without permission or right
intruder noun

More from Merriam-Webster on intrude

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!