insolence

noun

in·​so·​lence ˈin(t)-s(ə-)lən(t)s How to pronounce insolence (audio)
1
: the quality or state of being insolent
2
: an instance of insolent conduct or treatment

Examples of insolence in a Sentence

amazed that parents would tolerate such insolence from their teenaged children her frequent displays of insolence have lowered her standing among movie fans
Recent Examples on the Web In the worst-case scenario, the resistance escalated, paranoid readings of each party’s intentions dominated on both sides, and the classroom spiralled into suspicion, insolence, complaint, or outright rebellion. Merve Emre, The New Yorker, 11 July 2023 The insolence! Vulture, 16 Sep. 2022 But his insolence doesn’t offend the Elf, who’s been getting pretty close with some of these underlings—in particular the human woman Bronwyn (Nazanin Boniadi), with whom he’s developed an Arwen-Aragorn-like flirtation. Lauren Puckett-Pope, ELLE, 2 Sep. 2022 Harvey progresses from icy insolence to pitiable despondency, revealing the extent of Shaw’s lack of autonomy when he is accidentally triggered and walks into a lake; and Sinatra, in his best dramatic part, projects commanding fraternal feeling. Peter Tonguette, WSJ, 4 Nov. 2022 Apparently, Lindsay's behavior upset the Survivor Gods more than Geo's insolence. Dalton Ross, EW.com, 13 Oct. 2022 In spite of her insolence and his new son, Viserys is dead set on Rhaenyra inheriting the throne. Kelly Lawler, USA TODAY, 5 Sep. 2022 His naïve insolence punctures the vanities of other filmmakers while offering no alternative, and the movie that results is a joyless, confused self-abnegation. Richard Brody, The New Yorker, 11 Apr. 2022 Maternal indulgence perhaps helps explain Andrew’s sense of entitlement and insolence. Simon Usborne, Town & Country, 13 Mar. 2022 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'insolence.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

First Known Use

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of insolence was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near insolence

Cite this Entry

“Insolence.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/insolence. Accessed 23 Sep. 2023.

Kids Definition

insolence

noun
in·​so·​lence ˈin(t)-s(ə-)lən(t)s How to pronounce insolence (audio)
1
: the quality or state of being insolent
2
: an instance of insolent conduct or treatment

More from Merriam-Webster on insolence

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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