inherit

verb
in·her·it | \ in-ˈher-ət , -ˈhe-rət \
inherited; inheriting; inherits

Definition of inherit 

transitive verb

1 : to come into possession of or receive especially as a right or divine portion and every one who has left houses or brothers or sisters … for my name's sake, will receive a hundredfold, and inherit eternal life —Matthew 19:29 (Revised Standard Version)

2a : to receive from an ancestor as a right or title descendible by law at the ancestor's death

b : to receive as a devise or legacy

3 : to receive from a parent or ancestor by genetic transmission inherit a defective enzyme

4 : to have in turn or receive as if from an ancestor inherited the problem from his predecessor

intransitive verb

: to take or hold a possession or rights by inheritance

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Other words from inherit

inheritor \in-ˈher-ə-tər, -ˈhe-rə- \ noun
inheritress \in-ˈher-ə-trəs, -ˈhe-rə- \ or inheritrix \in-ˈher-ə-(ˌ)triks, -ˈhe-rə- \ noun

Examples of inherit in a Sentence

She inherited the family business from her father. Baldness is inherited from the mother's side of the family. She inherited her father's deep blue eyes. She inherited a love of baseball from her dad. When my brother left for college, I inherited his old computer. The company's new president will inherit some complicated legal problems. When the coach quit, her assistant inherited a last-place team.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Only a handful of the team Luhnow inherited would make it to the 2017 championship team. Matthew Wilson, USA TODAY, "'Astroball': How the Houston Astros climbed from baseball's basement to champions," 13 July 2018 Gianna, whose jutted jaw and silky fadeaway were inherited from her father, hopes to play for the Huskies. Lee Jenkins, SI.com, "Fantastic Voyage: Kobe Bryant Is Now an Entertainment Mogul with a Friendlier Mission," 12 July 2018 Snyder authored one of the greatest turnaround jobs in sports history, inheriting a program that had won 299 games in its first 93 years. Blair Kerkhoff, kansascity, "Bill Snyder remembers roots at dedication in his name," 12 July 2018 Venita Hood, president of the University Park Creative Arts School PTA, spent months contesting the plan Wilcox inherited to add neighborhood students to the north Charlotte magnet school in 2018-19. Ann Doss Helms, charlotteobserver, "Quiet agitator at CMS prepares to rattle some cages in his second year," 12 July 2018 Federal Debt and Deficits Trump inherited rising federal debt and deficits, and his tax cut and spending increases are projected to make both rise faster. Brooks Jackson, Philly.com, "Trump's Numbers (Second Quarterly Update) | FactCheck," 11 July 2018 But there’s no consensus on whether McIver’s right of survivorship trumps the state’s slayer statute, which prevents convicted killers from inheriting from their victim. Christian Boone, ajc, "Tex McIver’s Putnam County ranch on auction block," 11 July 2018 Peregrine Cavendish, the 12th Duke of Devonshire, inherited his majority ownership stake in London’s Heywood Hill bookstore after his father died in 2004. Jeffrey A. Trachtenberg, WSJ, "From a London Bookstore to the U.S. Reader," 5 July 2018 For more than 40 years, the 1951 half-ton Chevrolet pickup Bob Mason inherited from his father sat on cinder blocks in the backyard. Jason Pohl, azcentral, "Arcadia Fourth of July Parade: 'Unity instead of division'," 4 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'inherit.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of inherit

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for inherit

Middle English enheriten "to give (a person) right of inheritance, make (a person) heir, come into possession of as an heir," borrowed from Anglo-French enheriter, going back to Late Latin inhērēditāre "to appoint as heir," from Latin in- in- entry 2 + Late Latin hērēditāre "to leave as an inheritance, inherit, make an heir" — more at heritage

Middle French enheriter to make one an heir, from Late Latin inhereditare, from Latin in- in + hereditas inheritance

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Statistics for inherit

Last Updated

1 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for inherit

The first known use of inherit was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for inherit

inherit

verb

English Language Learners Definition of inherit

: to receive (money, property, etc.) from someone when that person dies

biology : to have (a characteristic, disease, etc.) because of the genes that you get from your parents when you are born

: to get (a personal quality, interest, etc.) because of the influence or example of your parents or other relatives

inherit

verb
in·her·it | \ in-ˈher-ət \
inherited; inheriting

Kids Definition of inherit

1 : to get by legal right from a person at his or her death

2 : to get by heredity I inherited red hair.

inherit

transitive verb
in·her·it | \ in-ˈher-ət \

Medical Definition of inherit 

: to receive from a parent or ancestor by genetic transmission

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inherit

verb
in·her·it | \ in-ˈher-it \

Legal Definition of inherit 

transitive verb

1 : to receive (property) from an estate by operation of the laws of intestacy broadly : to receive (property) either by will or through intestate succession

2 : succeed

intransitive verb

: to take or hold a possession or rights by inheritance

Other words from inherit

inheritor \in-ˈher-i-tər \ noun

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Comments on inherit

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