iconostasis

noun

plural iconostases ˌī-kə-ˈnä-stə-ˌsēz How to pronounce iconostasis (audio)
(ˌ)ī-ˈkä-nə-ˌstä-
: a screen or partition with doors and tiers of icons that separates the bema from the nave in Eastern churches

Examples of iconostasis in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Sinuously curving baseboards in an upstairs room, a seamless passage from wall to ceiling in the complicated stairwell, the hinges for the heavy stone doors of the iconostasis — if there was a standard way to execute each of these items, the architects specified another. Curbed, 6 Dec. 2022 Originally, the iconostasis hung inside a wooden church at the Manyava Orthodox Monastery in the foothills of the Carpathian Mountains, in what was then Polish Galicia. Joshua Hammer, Smithsonian Magazine, 5 May 2022 A few meters away, a group walked down the majestic main staircase carrying a giant piece of sacred art, the 18th century Bohorodchany iconostasis. Bernat Armangué, USA TODAY, 7 Mar. 2022

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'iconostasis.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

modification of Middle Greek eikonostasion, from Late Greek, shrine, from Greek eikono- + -stasion (from histanai to stand) — more at stand

First Known Use

1833, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of iconostasis was in 1833

Dictionary Entries Near iconostasis

Cite this Entry

“Iconostasis.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/iconostasis. Accessed 14 Jun. 2024.

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