hammer

noun
ham·​mer | \ ˈha-mər How to pronounce hammer (audio) \

Definition of hammer

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a hand tool consisting of a solid head set crosswise on a handle and used for pounding
b : a power tool that often substitutes a metal block or a drill for the hammerhead
2 : something that resembles a hammer in form or action: such as
a : a lever with a striking head for ringing a bell or striking a gong
b(1) : an arm that strikes the cap in a percussion lock to ignite the propelling charge
(2) : a part of the action of a modern gun that strikes the primer of the cartridge in firing or that strikes the firing pin to ignite the cartridge
c : malleus
d : gavel
e(1) : a padded mallet in a piano action for striking a string
(2) : a hand mallet for playing on various percussion instruments (such as a xylophone)
3 : a metal sphere thrown for distance in the hammer throw
under the hammer
: for sale at auction

hammer

verb
hammered; hammering\ ˈha-​mər-​iŋ How to pronounce hammering (audio) , ˈham-​riŋ \

Definition of hammer (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to strike blows especially repeatedly with or as if with a hammer : pound
2 : to make repeated efforts especially : to reiterate an opinion or attitude the lectures all hammered away at the same points

transitive verb

1a : to beat, drive, or shape with repeated blows of a hammer
b : to fasten or build with a hammer
2 : to strike or drive with a force suggesting a hammer blow or repeated blows hammered the ball over the fence tried to hammer me into submission
3 : to criticize severely

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Other Words from hammer

Verb

hammerer \ ˈha-​mər-​ər How to pronounce hammerer (audio) \ noun

Synonyms for hammer

Synonyms: Verb

beat, draw, forge, pound

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Examples of hammer in a Sentence

Verb

He hammered the dent out of the fender. The carpenters were hammering all afternoon. The workers are hammering the studs to the frame. The batter hammered the ball over the fence. Someone tried to hammer him over the head with a club. Many towns were hammered by the hurricane. The typist's fingers were hammering the keys. He was hammering at the door. The rain hammered down on the roof. The home team was hammered 9–0.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The contestants and their assistants blow, sweat, grunt, hammer, and stoke hot flames for hours on end. Rachel Syme, The New Yorker, "The Fiery Pleasures of “Blown Away,” a Reality-TV Competition for Glassblowing," 31 July 2019 The proclamation in January of an independent Ukrainian church was a hammer-blow to that pan-Slavic concept. Erasmus, The Economist, "Why Vladimir Putin took an atheist to an ancient monastery," 21 July 2019 Tottenham have downgraded West Ham United to Category B for ticket sales in the 2019/20 season, in a hammer blow to the Irons' ego. SI.com, "Tottenham Hilariously Downgrade West Ham Game to Category B in Ticket Sales for 2019/20 Season," 4 July 2019 Crouch-Hydes landed a hammer blow in today’s deal in the fourth quarter. Frank Stewart, The Mercury News, "Bridge: June 11, 2019," 11 June 2019 In the fishing village of Kaukira, worshippers are called to church by the sound of a hammer on a diving tank instead of a bell. Moises Castillo, The Seattle Times, "AP PHOTOS: Lobster divers risk injury, death in Honduras," 26 Dec. 2018 The collapse of a company such as Evergrande would be a hammer blow to Chinese investor confidence. Jacky Wong, WSJ, "Evergrande’s Ever-Deeper Peril," 4 July 2018 The significant point in the Pennsylvania Supreme Court’s hammer blow decision is the fact that the court pretty plainly has had enough of that state’s legislature. Charles P. Pierce, Esquire, "We're Approaching the Gerrymandering Tipping Point," 22 Jan. 2018 The glass screens of the A.T.M.s of HSBC were splintered from the blows of hammers. Christopher Ketcham, Harper's magazine, "A Play with No End," 22 July 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos repeatedly hammers home similar points. Roger Sollenberger, The New Republic, "Higher Education Faces a Turning Point," 5 Aug. 2019 Waller dispensed with the usual platitudes and pleasantries, hammering home his ideas for solving Mississippi’s most glaring problems and sounding almost liberal at times. Bob Moser, The New Yorker, "Mississippi’s Race for Governor Tests the Limits of Conservatism," 2 Aug. 2019 Expect Republicans, though, to hammer home the point that after a nearly two-year investigation, Mueller did not ultimately charge a conspiracy between any Trump official and any Russian to interfere with the 2016 election. Andrew Prokop, Vox, "Watch live: Robert Mueller’s testimony about the Trump-Russia investigation," 24 July 2019 The team let the Union’s leading goal scorer, Kacper Przybyłko, float free in the box to hammer home a volley from captain Alejandro Bedoya in the opening minute of the half. Julia Poe, Pro Soccer USA, "Three things we learned from Orlando City’s 3-1 loss to Philadelphia," 6 July 2019 Bernie Sanders dominated the opening segment of the debate, hammering home his own talking points, taking on Joe Biden and jumping in frequently to weigh in on questions first posed to other candidates. Jonathan Allen, NBC News, "Sanders dominates start of second-night debate," 28 June 2019 To hammer home the point, Iran then shot down an American surveillance drone. New York Times, "The Week in Business: Stocks Hit a Record High, and Facebook Wants to Replace Your Bank," 22 June 2019 Belichick likes to hammer home the idea that every year is a new year, every team a new creation, starting from scratch. Jarrett Bell, USA TODAY, "Opinion: Patriots' challenge in offseason is to merge new elements with old ones," 4 June 2019 The costumes also have to work in concert with the set design and hair and makeup to really hammer home the nature of these people. Adam Rathe, Town & Country, "How the Costumes in The Favourite Help Tell the Story of Queen Anne," 21 Nov. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'hammer.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of hammer

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for hammer

Noun

Middle English hamer, from Old English hamor; akin to Old High German hamar hammer, and perhaps to Old Church Slavonic kamen-, kamy stone, Greek akmē point, edge — more at edge

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Statistics for hammer

Last Updated

9 Aug 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for hammer

The first known use of hammer was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for hammer

hammer

noun

English Language Learners Definition of hammer

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a tool that has a heavy metal head attached to a handle and that is used for hitting nails or breaking things apart
: a similar tool made usually of wood and used especially for hitting a surface to make a loud noise
: the part of a gun that strikes a charge causing the gun to shoot

hammer

verb

English Language Learners Definition of hammer (Entry 2 of 2)

: to force (something) into a particular place or shape by hitting it with a hammer
: to attach (something) with a hammer and nails
: to hit (something or someone) in a very forceful way

hammer

noun
ham·​mer | \ ˈha-mər How to pronounce hammer (audio) \

Kids Definition of hammer

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a tool consisting of a head fastened to a handle and used for pounding something (as a nail)
2 : something like a hammer in shape or action an auctioneer's hammer
3 : a heavy metal ball with a flexible handle thrown for distance in a track-and-field contest ( hammer throw )

hammer

verb
hammered; hammering

Kids Definition of hammer (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to strike with a hammer
2 : to fasten or build (as by nailing) with a hammer Hammer the lid shut.
3 : to hit something hard and repeatedly She hammered on the door.
4 : to beat hard His heart hammered.
hammer out
: to produce or bring about by persistent effort “They hammered out those rules after the failure ten years ago.”— Lois Lowry, The Giver

hammer

noun
ham·​mer | \ ˈham-ər How to pronounce hammer (audio) \

Medical Definition of hammer

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More from Merriam-Webster on hammer

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with hammer

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for hammer

Spanish Central: Translation of hammer

Nglish: Translation of hammer for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of hammer for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about hammer

Comments on hammer

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