guanine

noun
gua·​nine | \ ˈgwä-ˌnēn How to pronounce guanine (audio) \

Definition of guanine

: a purine base C5H5N5O that codes genetic information in the polynucleotide chain of DNA or RNA — compare adenine, cytosine, thymine, uracil

Examples of guanine in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web

Part of this gene contains repeated segments for three of the letters of the DNA code—cytosine, adenine and guanine, which are known as CAG repeats. Bret Stetka, Scientific American, "Antisense Drugs for Huntington’s, ALS and Prion Diseases Could Meet the Dire Need for Brain Treatments," 15 Aug. 2019 However, rather than the conventional duo of base pairs, adenine and uracil or cytosine and guanine, the molecules form hexamers, or six-membered rings. Quanta Magazine, "Chemists Seek Possible Precursor to RNA," 5 Feb. 2014 In 1953, scientists proposed that DNA is structured as a double helix, with the chemical bases—adenine (A), cytosine (C), guanine (G), and thymine (T)—stacked up in pairs between two intertwining lengths of sugar and phosphate. Ryan Rossotto, National Geographic, "DNA, explained," 12 June 2019 For instance, with height, having a guanine base instead of a cytosine one in a particular DNA region might correlate with being 0.1 millimeter taller than average. Quanta Magazine, "New Turmoil Over Predicting the Effects of Genes," 23 Apr. 2019 The bases are often referred to as A, C, G and T, the initials of their full chemical names, adenine, cytosine, guanine and thymine. The Economist, "BiotechnologyGene editing takes another step forward," 26 Oct. 2017 The nascent technology converts the 1s and 0s of computing’s binary code into A, C, G and T, the letters that correspond to DNA base types, adenine, cytosine, guanine and thymine. Jay Greene, WSJ, "Malware Stored in Synthetic DNA Can Take Over a PC, Researchers Find," 10 Aug. 2017 The vast chains of DNA in each cell are made of just four molecules — adenine, guanine, thymine and cytosine — arranged in enormously varied configurations. Gina Kolata, The Seattle Times, "Who needs hard drives? Scientists store film clip in DNA," 12 July 2017 The vast chains of DNA in each cell are made of just four molecules — adenine, guanine, thymine and cytosine — arranged in enormously varied configurations. Gina Kolata, New York Times, "Who Needs Hard Drives? Scientists Store Film Clip in DNA," 12 July 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'guanine.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of guanine

1850, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for guanine

guano + -ine; from its being found especially in guano

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Last Updated

28 Aug 2019

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The first known use of guanine was in 1850

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More Definitions for guanine

guanine

noun
gua·​nine | \ ˈgwän-ˌēn How to pronounce guanine (audio) \

Medical Definition of guanine

: a purine base C5H5N5O that codes genetic information in the polynucleotide chain of DNA or RNA — compare adenine, cytosine, thymine, uracil

More from Merriam-Webster on guanine

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about guanine

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