fur

verb
\ ˈfər How to pronounce fur (audio) \
furred; furring

Definition of fur

 (Entry 1 of 3)

transitive verb

1 : to cover, line, trim, or clothe with fur
2 : to coat or clog as if with fur
3 : to apply furring to

intransitive verb

: to become coated or clogged as if with fur

fur

noun, often attributive

Definition of fur (Entry 2 of 3)

1 : a piece of the dressed pelt of an animal used to make, trim, or line wearing apparel
2 : an article of clothing made of or with fur
3 : the hairy coat of a mammal especially when fine, soft, and thick also : such a coat with the skin
4 : a coating resembling fur: such as
a : a coat of epithelial debris on the tongue
b : the thick pile of a fabric (such as chenille)

Definition of fur (Entry 3 of 3)

furlong

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Other Words from fur

Noun

furless \ ˈfər-​ləs How to pronounce furless (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms for fur

Synonyms: Noun

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Did You Know?

When the word fur first came into English, it was a verb that meant “to line a person’s garment with the soft hair of an animal.” The noun developed from the verb. First, the noun referred to the animal hair that was used for lining and trimming a garment. Then it came to refer to the hairy coat on the animal itself. The verb, not much used anymore, was taken from the early French verb furrer, meaning “to stuff, fill, line.” It was formed from an earlier French word meaning “a sheath.” Thus our word fur for the hairy coat that covers or encases an animal traces back to a word for a sheath that encases a knife or sword.

Examples of fur in a Sentence

Noun The cat has black-and-white fur. The rabbit's fur is soft. Her gloves are lined with fur. He made his fortune trading furs in the 17th century. Her new fur is a full-length mink coat. a teddy bear with soft fur
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Without the companion app, FurReal is still a responsive robot who makes calm, happy noises when kids pet it on its furred back, or barks a warning when its tail is tweaked. USA TODAY, "32 incredible coding toys that every kid will want," 27 Mar. 2020 Whether feathered or furred, all of these animals belong to the same political species: the bird-dogger. Samuel Ashworth, Washington Post, "The Beautiful Art of Hassling Politicians While Wearing Animal Costumes," 24 Feb. 2020 At the pool’s edge, mosses fur the stones in newborn green, and white flowers bloom, their perfume carried lightly on the vapor cast off by the waterfall. Seija Rankin, EW.com, "Read an exclusive excerpt of Saint X, the buzzy new novel about a missing teenager," 22 Jan. 2020 That was my America right there: pastel greenish-brown of grass furring the rolling hills. Colin Barrett, Harper's magazine, "“Just Keep Going North”," 5 July 2019 Even a few hours in a fruit bowl on a summer afternoon is enough to fur them with mold, after which emergency measures may or may not help. 3. New York Times, "The Best Fruits of Summer, Ranked," 22 May 2018 One vendor sold from racks of authentic furs while another offered a fur tissue box covers and fur hot water bottles. Beth Spotswood, San Francisco Chronicle, "Edgewood Auxiliary puts on a high-end fundraiser for Bay Area kids," 1 May 2018 His usual hot-spot area is fully furred and not itchy. Wes Siler, Outside Online, "So You Want to Get Your Dog on a Raw-Foot Diet," 24 Apr. 2018 But full lips and furred brows aside, her influence on fashion is debatable. Ruth La Ferla, New York Times, "Nothing Comes Between Brooke Shields and Her New Line for QVC," 14 Mar. 2018 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun China, which produces about a third of the mink fur market, and the United States have not reported any virus outbreaks in minks or in animals at other farms. Fox News, "In Spain and the Netherlands, scientists examine coronavirus outbreaks at mink farms," 3 Aug. 2020 The blacksmith shop at the Agency House was established in 1830 on land that for thousands of years was traversed by Native Americans and, in 1673, by Father Jacques Marquette and fur trader Louis Joliet. Barry Adams, Star Tribune, "A picture of the past emerges in Portage," 1 Aug. 2020 For the pointed part of the ears, simply cut triangles from faux craft fur, then sew or hot-glue a little bit of sparkly silver fabric to them. Taysha Murtaugh, Country Living, "How to DIY Cat Costumes for Kids This Halloween," 30 July 2020 These maximalist little booties feature cute ears, a ton of cozy fur and a patterned furry exterior for the toddler who wants it all. Krystin Arneson, CNN Underscored, "Uggs are up to 55% off at Nordstrom Rack right now," 29 July 2020 Swipe on a purple lip and add your go-to faux fur coat from last winter to create a two-second Sulley look. Seventeen.com Editors, Seventeen, "44 Easy Disney Halloween Costumes That Will Make You Cry Tears of Nostalgia," 29 July 2020 More than a year after the infamous Game of Thrones series finale, Sophie Turner has comfortably swapped Sansa Stark's heavy capes and fur regalia for a wardrobe much more appropriate for sunny Los Angeles. Chelsey Sanchez, Harper's BAZAAR, "Sophie Turner's Babydoll Minidress Is Perfect for Summer," 13 July 2020 Another bioblitz option is to be on the lookout for bigger animals with fur or feathers. Avery Hurt, National Geographic, "Take kids on a backyard safari," 26 June 2020 Because panting plays a bigger role in cooling a dog down than sweat, dog with thicker fur aren't necessarily more prone to overheating, Rickard says. Jo Yurcaba, Woman's Day, "Do Dogs Sweat? Here's What Happens To Your Pup When It's Hot," 2 Jan. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'fur.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of fur

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for fur

Verb

Middle English furren, from Anglo-French furrer to stuff, fill, line, from fuerre sheath, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German fuotar sheath; akin to Greek pōma lid, cover, Sanskrit pāti he protects

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Time Traveler for fur

Time Traveler

The first known use of fur was in the 14th century

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Statistics for fur

Cite this Entry

“Fur.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/fur. Accessed 8 Aug. 2020.

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More Definitions for fur

fur

noun

English Language Learners Definition of fur

: the hairy coat of an animal especially when it is soft and thick
: the fur of an animal used for clothing
: a piece of clothing (such as a coat) made with fur

fur

noun
\ ˈfər How to pronounce fur (audio) \

Kids Definition of fur

1 : the hairy coat of a mammal especially when fine, soft, and thick
2 : a piece of the pelt of an animal
3 : an article of clothing made with fur

Other Words from fur

furred \ ˈfərd \ adjective

fur

noun, often attributive
\ ˈfər How to pronounce fur (audio) \

Medical Definition of fur

1 : the hairy coat of a mammal especially when fine, soft, and thick
2 : a coat of epithelial debris on the tongue

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More from Merriam-Webster on fur

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for fur

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with fur

Spanish Central: Translation of fur

Nglish: Translation of fur for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of fur for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about fur

Comments on fur

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