fodder

noun
fod·der | \ˈfä-dər \

Definition of fodder 

1 : something fed to domestic animals especially : coarse food for cattle, horses, or sheep

2 : inferior or readily available material used to supply a heavy demand fodder for tabloids This sort of breezy plot line has become cheap fodder for novelists and screenwriters …— Sally Bedell

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Other Words from fodder

fodder transitive verb

Examples of fodder in a Sentence

His antics always make good fodder for the gossip columnists. She often used her friends' problems as fodder for her novels.

Recent Examples on the Web

His relationship with pop star Gwen Stefani is perpetual tabloid fodder. Erik Ernst, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Blake Shelton may have gone Hollywood, but he shows at Summerfest that he's still country," 6 July 2018 In one scene, the man’s disappearance becomes small-talk fodder—and a minor character reaches for his name, but can’t quite remember it. Hannah Giorgis, The Atlantic, "Dietland Envisions a World of Female Revenge," 5 June 2018 One of the simplest and cleverest barrier methods survived the centuries to become fodder for an iconic Seinfeld scene. Carolyn Todd, Allure, "The History and Evolution of Birth Control in America," 12 July 2018 Surveillance video showing Peterson with his back against a wall outside, never entering the building, is fodder for those who accuse him of doing nothing. Eliott C. Mclaughlin, CNN, "School resource officer spends his days reliving the Parkland massacre," 4 June 2018 In addition, Solomon said, mushrooms bring an umami flavor that makes them great blending fodder. Marc Bona, cleveland.com, "Blended Burger Project waves sustainability flag in Cleveland," 7 May 2018 Kardashian’s choices are dissected, her most extreme emotions broadcast for ridicule, her body fodder for public debate. Lucas Mann, The Atlantic, "What Exactly Makes Trump a 'Reality-TV President'?," 30 Apr. 2018 Valdes is the only man in his sled who doesn't serve in the Army, which is fodder for teasing by his teammates. Daniel Langhorne, latimes.com, "Olympic bobsledder gets Mariners Christian School's first Distinguished Alumni Award," 17 Apr. 2018 No wonder a sensitive soul like the local choir director (a harrowing James Ridge) — fodder for gossip and remorselessly judged — doesn’t fit in. Mike Fischer, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Milwaukee Rep delivers darkness on the edge of 'Our Town'," 14 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'fodder.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of fodder

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for fodder

Middle English, from Old English fōdor; akin to Old High German fuotar food — more at food

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Statistics for fodder

Last Updated

11 Oct 2018

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Time Traveler for fodder

The first known use of fodder was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for fodder

fodder

noun

English Language Learners Definition of fodder

: food given to horses, cows, etc.

: material that is used for a particular purpose

fodder

noun
fod·der | \ˈfä-dər \

Kids Definition of fodder

: coarse dry food (as cornstalks) for livestock

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Comments on fodder

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