firestorm

noun
fire·​storm | \ ˈfī(-ə)r-ˌstȯrm How to pronounce firestorm (audio) \

Definition of firestorm

1 : a very intense and destructive fire usually accompanied by high winds The Rooses' house and gardens were obliterated in the 1991 Oakland firestorm.— Craig Summers Black especially : one that is started by attack with nuclear or incendiary weapons and that creates a powerful updraft which causes very strong inrushing winds to develop in the surrounding area His goal was to create firestorms like the ones that had consumed Hamburg and Dresden, conflagrations so vast and intense that nothing could survive them … — David M. Kennedy
2a : a sudden or violent outburst a firestorm of public protest
b : a raging controversy a political firestorm

Keep scrolling for more

Examples of firestorm in a Sentence

The bombing left the city engulfed in a firestorm. His proposal set off a political firestorm. a firestorm of public protest
See More
Recent Examples on the Web Now a young, autonomous Black woman is at the center of the firestorm. Essence, 7 July 2021 Checking rates across the world, none of the major markets seems to anticipate any sort of inflationary firestorm in the near future. Jj Kinahan, Forbes, 25 June 2021 That news was a relief to Mayor Dean Trantalis, who has found himself at the center of a political firestorm of late. Susannah Bryan, sun-sentinel.com, 22 June 2021 Six years ago, North Charleston Police were at the center of a national firestorm when video went viral of a 50-year-old African American, Walter Scott, being shot in the back while running away from police. CBS News, 6 June 2021 The 51-year-old Crump has been at the center of virtually every racial firestorm in the last eight years. John Blake, CNN, 22 May 2021 Nunes quickly found himself at the center of a political firestorm in Washington over his quick release of a controversial memo that dismissed the allegations and cleared the president’s campaign of any wrongdoing. Los Angeles Times, 18 May 2021 When Republican Henry County Commissioner Gary Barham died unexpectedly in early March from complications of COVID-19, the future of his seat touched off a political firestorm. Leon Stafford, ajc, 2 July 2021 But opposition from the right quickly blew up into a firestorm that was not entirely accurate. Peter Greene, Forbes, 23 June 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'firestorm.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of firestorm

1945, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More About firestorm

Time Traveler for firestorm

Time Traveler

The first known use of firestorm was in 1945

See more words from the same year

Dictionary Entries Near firestorm

fire-stop

firestorm

fire superiority

See More Nearby Entries 

Statistics for firestorm

Last Updated

26 Jul 2021

Cite this Entry

“Firestorm.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/firestorm. Accessed 5 Aug. 2021.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for firestorm

firestorm

noun

English Language Learners Definition of firestorm

: a very large fire that destroys everything in its path and produces powerful winds
: a large amount of anger and criticism

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Dog Words Quiz

  • shiba puppy more or less demanding cuddles
  • Which of the following animals has a dog in its etymology?
True or False

Test your knowledge - and maybe learn something along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Universal Daily Crossword

A daily challenge for crossword fanatics.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!