fair warning

noun

: enough warning to be able to avoid something bad
I'm giving you fair warning that you had better not discuss politics at dinner tonight.

Examples of fair warning in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web But fair warning — the train can only carry up to 20 passengers at a time. Cailey Rizzo, Travel + Leisure, 23 May 2024 And fair warning, like her tour this article is an extensive rollercoaster. Bryan West, USA TODAY, 17 Mar. 2024 But fair warning: The rush of getting that perfect piece is just the beginning. Blake Bakkila, Sunset Magazine, 5 Jan. 2024 Everyone, regardless of age, needs at least fair warning about something that could kill them. Orlando Sentinel and South Florida Sun Sentinel Editorial Boards, Orlando Sentinel, 2 Jan. 2024 Actions will stand out and give those around you a fair warning that things are about to change. Eugenia Last, The Mercury News, 9 Feb. 2024 Foul aroma gives you a fair warning of this beer’s moldy grain flavor — that’s my unhappy experience with bottled 0.0. Peter Rowe, San Diego Union-Tribune, 5 Jan. 2024 Providing fair warning for her unruly behavior, Lykez belches into the mic and cautions that, with one wrong move, her hands might end up around your throat. Pitchfork, 7 Dec. 2023 Just a fair warning that all of these appealing pursuits require leaving the fireplace coziness and panoramic views of your room at the Ojai Valley Inn, a proposition that might not be so easy for many pairs. Lindsay Cohn, Travel + Leisure, 18 June 2022

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'fair warning.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Dictionary Entries Near fair warning

Cite this Entry

“Fair warning.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/fair%20warning. Accessed 24 Jun. 2024.

Legal Definition

fair warning

noun
: sufficient notification in a statute that particular conduct constitutes a crime see also void-for-vagueness doctrine
Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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