escrow

1 of 2

noun

es·​crow ˈe-ˌskrō How to pronounce escrow (audio)
e-ˈskrō
1
: a deed, a bond, money, or a piece of property held in trust by a third party to be turned over to the grantee only upon fulfillment of a condition
2
: a fund or deposit designed to serve as an escrow

escrow

2 of 2

verb

escrowed; escrowing; escrows

transitive verb

: to place in escrow
Phrases
in escrow
: in trust as an escrow
had $1000 in escrow to pay taxes

Did you know?

the form of a deed, money or property, escrow is that is held by a third party and handed over to the grantee only upon the fulfillment of some condition. In commercial usage, this condition is most often the performance of some act by the party who is to receive the instrument. Escrow is also used in family transactions (as when the death of one family member results in an instrument being delivered to another family member).

Example Sentences

Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
The entire five-year sum is to be placed in escrow, upon signing of this contract, in an interest-bearing account under the control of a neutral party and disbursed quarterly. Michael Hiltzik, Los Angeles Times, 15 Nov. 2022 The funds are held in escrow, according to Voyager. Caitlin Ostroff, WSJ, 11 Nov. 2022 Last season, players had 17.2% of their salaries held in escrow, all of which ended up in the owners’ pockets. Brett Knight, Forbes, 5 Oct. 2022 That, Ives said, is likely to be a large chunk of money held in a non-refundable escrow account that would go to Twitter if Musk doesn’t deliver. Tom Krisher, Fortune, 7 Oct. 2022 Making matters worse, NHL players are still feeling the effects of the pandemic thanks to an escrow system that ensures the league’s players and team owners equally divide revenue. Brett Knight, Forbes, 5 Oct. 2022 Her mom worked as a bookkeeper after high school, and eventually co-owned several small businesses, including a dress shop and an escrow company. Isabel González Whitaker, ELLE, 22 Sep. 2022 Some auction companies, but not the IRS, require the bidder to pay closing costs such as escrow fees, back taxes and broker commissions or a buyer’s premium, which is a percentage of the hammer price. oregonlive, 3 Aug. 2022 This year, a data center company, Green Data Center Real Estate Inc., put up nearly $1 million in escrow money toward buying the site, Kelly said, but its bid fell through. Robert Mccoppin, chicagotribune.com, 1 Oct. 2021
Verb
Even with the approval, the Tailgate Park transaction must close escrow before the end of the year to remain shielded from the state’s stricter disposition laws for surplus land. Jennifer Van Grove, San Diego Union-Tribune, 19 Apr. 2022 Buyers would escrow the difference with the U.S. Treasury. Patrick Jenevein, Fortune, 12 Apr. 2022 The Tailgate Park transaction must close escrow before the end of the year to remain shielded from the state’s stricter disposition laws for surplus land. Jennifer Van Grove, San Diego Union-Tribune, 10 Mar. 2022 The city and Padres are racing against the clock — because of state disposition laws, the transaction must close escrow by Dec. 23 or it will be aborted altogether. Jennifer Van Grove, San Diego Union-Tribune, 3 Mar. 2022 Starting next summer, McCarty’s AB 1466 will require Realtors, title companies and escrow companies to notify buyers of any racial covenants, as well as their right to modify them. Lauren Hepler, San Francisco Chronicle, 15 Nov. 2021 While the seller is going to get the same amount of money, many local agents say sellers will go with cash offers to make sure the purchase closes escrow. Phillip Molnar, San Diego Union-Tribune, 9 July 2021 The building, which includes two other small businesses at the corner of Vista Way, has been sold to a developer who plans extensive renovations once escrow closes in August. Phil Diehl, San Diego Union-Tribune, 11 July 2021 At the very start of the pandemic, agency lenders required borrowers to escrow 18 months of property taxes and interest payments to qualify for acquisition loans. Lee Kiser, Forbes, 13 May 2021 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'escrow.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

Etymology

Noun

Anglo-French escroue scroll — more at scroll

First Known Use

Noun

1594, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1946, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of escrow was in 1594

Dictionary Entries Near escrow

Cite this Entry

“Escrow.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/escrow. Accessed 6 Dec. 2022.

Kids Definition

escrow

noun

es·​crow
e-ˈskrō
: something (as a deed or a sum of money) delivered by one person to another to be delivered by the second to a third party only upon the fulfillment of a condition
in escrow
: in trust as an escrow
held {dollar}500 in escrow for taxes
escrow verb

Legal Definition

escrow 1 of 2

noun

es·​crow ˈes-ˌkrō How to pronounce escrow (audio)
1
: an instrument and especially a deed or money or property held by a third party to be turned over to the grantee and become effective only upon the fulfillment of some condition
2
: a fund or deposit designed to serve as an escrow
in escrow
: held as an escrow : in trust as an escrow
had $1000 in escrow to pay taxes
compare trust

escrow

2 of 2

transitive verb

: to cause to be held as an escrow : place in escrow

History and Etymology for escrow

Noun

Anglo-French escroue deed delivered on condition, literally, scroll, strip of parchment, from Old French escroe

More from Merriam-Webster on escrow

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