ejec·​ta | \ i-ˈjek-tə How to pronounce ejecta (audio) \

Definition of ejecta

: material thrown out (as from a volcano)

Examples of ejecta in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web But a little bit of ejecta, the bits moving fastest after DART’s impact, could reach Earth’s sky relatively quickly and give scientists an opportunity to see the asteroid’s makeup. Michael Ruiz, Fox News, "NASA asteroid defense test mission may trigger artificial meteor shower, study finds," 14 May 2020 The ejecta curtain, or plume of material created by the impact, never fully detached from the surface, according to the study. Ashley Strickland, CNN, "What scientists learned after firing a small cannonball into a near-Earth asteroid," 19 Mar. 2020 Likely created from the ejecta thrown out when Mare Imbrium was created, the Fra Mauro site was thought to potentially contain material from deep inside the Moon that could shed light on our companion satellite's origin. Frank O’brien, Ars Technica, "A deep dive into the Apollo Guidance Computer, and the hack that saved Apollo 14," 30 Jan. 2020 And modelling suggests the planet would have been a pretty uncomfortable place for quite some time afterwards, with ejecta suspended in the atmosphere blotting out the sun, and acid rain changing the chemical composition of the oceans. The Economist, "Palaeontology What really killed the dinosaurs?," 18 Jan. 2020 By modeling the evolution of ejecta fragments from the collision, researchers of a 2015 study on lunar formation estimated the moon formed around 4.47 billion years ago. 8. Kristen Rogers, CNN, "The US proposed nuking the moon, and other surprising facts about Earth's celestial satellite," 22 Nov. 2019 Now scientists also know that GRBs are able to accelerate particles within the explosion ejecta. Megan Gannon, Smithsonian, "Astronomers Detect Record-Breaking Gamma Ray Bursts From Colossal Explosion in Space," 14 Jan. 2019 Once released from the stern section, the bow fell to the ocean floor at a fairly steep angle, nosing into the mud with such massive force that its ejecta patterns are still visible on the seafloor today. National Geographic, "How the Titanic was lost and found," 22 Aug. 2019 Some ejecta from volcanoes even fall back on the surfaces of other moons like Europa, a prime candidate in the search for life. Joshua Sokol, New York Times, "This World Is a Simmering Hellscape. They’ve Been Watching Its Explosions.," 26 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'ejecta.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of ejecta

1886, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for ejecta

New Latin, from Latin, neuter plural of ejectus

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Time Traveler for ejecta

Time Traveler

The first known use of ejecta was in 1886

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Statistics for ejecta

Last Updated

21 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Ejecta.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ejecta. Accessed 29 May. 2020.

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More Definitions for ejecta

ejecta

noun
ejec·​ta | \ i-ˈjek-tə How to pronounce ejecta (audio) \

Medical Definition of ejecta

: matter (as vomit) ejected from the body

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Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with ejecta

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